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Kali Linux 2019.2 Release

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GNU
Linux
Security

Welcome to our second release of 2019, Kali Linux 2019.2, which is available for immediate download. This release brings our kernel up to version 4.19.28, fixes numerous bugs, includes many updated packages, and most excitingly, features a new release of Kali Linux NetHunter!

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Kail Linux 2019.2 Is Out

  • The Antergos Distro Is Ending, HP Linux Imaging and Printing Software Updated to Version 3.19.5, Kail Linux 2019.2 Is Out, Tails 3.14 Released and openSUSE 15.1 Leap Is Now Available

    Kali Linux announces its second release of the year, Kali Linux 2019.2. This release "brings our kernel up to version 4.19.28, fixes numerous bugs, includes many updated packages, and most excitingly, features a new release of Kali Linux NetHunter!" You can download it from here.

    Tails 3.14 has been released. The release fixes many security issues, so you are urged to update as soon as possible. Some changes include an update to kernel 4.19.37, enabling "all available mitigations for the MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) attacks and disable SMT (simultaneous multithreading) on all vulnerable processors to fix the RIDL, Fallout and ZombieLoad security vulnerabilities" and updating the Tor Browser to 8.5, among others.

Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Supports Android

  • Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Supports More Than 50 Android Devices

    Powered by the Linux 4.19.28 kernel, Kali Linux 2019.2 is here to introduce a new release of the Kali Linux NetHunter toolkit, which lets you run Kali Linux on Android-based mobile devices. The Kali Linux NetHunter 2019.2 release adds support for 13 new devices.

    These include the Nexus 6, Nexus 6P, OnePlus 2, and Galaxy Tab S4 (both LTE and Wi-Fi models). With this, the Kali Linux NetHunter toolkit now support more than 50 devices powered by a wide-range of Android OS releases, from Android 4.4 KitKat to Android 9 Pie.

Kali Linux 2019.2 Release And What’s New

  • Kali Linux 2019.2 Release And What’s New

    The Kali Linux team is announced the availability of Kali Linux 2019.2. It’s second release of 2019, which is available for immediate download.

    This new release shipped with kernel 4.19.28, fixes numerous bugs, includes many updated packages, and more.

Kali Linux 2019.2 released with updated kernel and more

  • Kali Linux 2019.2 released with updated kernel and Kali Linux NetHunter

    Three months after the last major release, it's time for the second Kali Linux release of the year. Kali Linux 2019.2 is here, and in addition to an updated kernel, there's also an updated version of Kali Linux NetHunter, complete with support for more Android devices.

    Offensive Security says that the Debian-based Kali Linux 2019.2 is primarily about tweaks and bug fixes, but there are still a number of updated tools included.

Kali Linux 2019.2 Released With NetHunter 2019.2 & New Kernel

  • Kali Linux 2019.2 Released With NetHunter 2019.2 And New Kernel

    Offensive Security, the makers of Kali Linux, have shipped their second release in 2019. The new Kali Linux 2019.2 distribution is now available for ethical hackers and security researchers. This release brings along many bug fixes and updated packages that are surely worth upgrading.

    Before you move ahead to explore the new changes in Kali Linux 2019.2, let me tell you about our new list of best Kali tools for hacking and pen-testing. These tools are highly recommended if you are willing to kickstart a journey in the field of ethical hacking.

    Coming back to the latest Kali 2019.2. Offensive Security adopted a rolling release model a few years back and it continuously keeps updating the existing Kali installations. But what if a new user needs to perform a clean installation? To address this issue, the developers keep releasing fresh Kali builds from time to time and ensure that new downloads contain bug fixes, new Linux kernel, and other updates.

By Rogue Media Labs

  • Kali Linux Rolls Out Second Update of 2019

    Earlier today, May 22nd 2019, the popular Ethical Hacking Linux distro known as Kali Linux rolled out their 2nd update of 2019, following their last release in February 2019. Perhaps headlining today’s release is a new integration with NetHunter, allowing for a more seamless running of Kali Linux OS on Android mobile devices. The updates also features new integrations with ARM, cleaning up some of the file size problems and speeding up its operation.

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