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Firefox 67.0 Released

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Moz/FF
  • Version 67.0, first offered to Release channel users on May 21, 2019
  • Latest Firefox Release is Faster than Ever

    With the introduction of the new Firefox Quantum browser in 2017 we changed the look, feel, and performance of our core product. Since then we have launched new products to complement your experience when you’re using Firefox and serve you beyond the browser. This includes Facebook Container, Firefox Monitor and Firefox Send. Collectively, they work to protect your privacy and keep you safe so you can do the things you love online with ease and peace of mind. We’ve been delivering on that promise to you for more than twenty years by putting your security and privacy first in the building of products that are open and accessible to all.

    Today’s new Firefox release continues to bring fast and private together right at the crossroads of performance and security. It includes improvements that continue to keep Firefox fast while giving you more control and assurance through new features that your personal information is safe while you’re online with us.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released, ownCloud Announces New Server Version 10.2, Google Launches "Glass Enterprise Edition 2" Headset, Ubuntu Expands Its Kernel Uploader Team and Kenna Security Reports Almost 20% of Popular Docker Containers Have No Root Password

    Firefox 67.0 was released today. From the Mozilla blog: "Today's new Firefox release continues to bring fast and private together right at the crossroads of performance and security. It includes improvements that continue to keep Firefox fast while giving you more control and assurance through new features that your personal information is safe while you're online with us." You can download it from here, and see the release notes for details.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released, Upgrading to Dav1d AV1 Decoder

    Mozilla Firefox 67.0 was released today with performance improvements and some new features.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released With Better Performance, Switches To Dav1d AV1 Decoder

    Mozilla set sail Firefox 67.0 this morning as the newest version of this web browser and the update is heavy on the feature front.

    Firefox 67.0 brings a number of performance improvements, the ability to block known cryptominers/fingerprinters, better keyboard accessibility, usability/security enhancements to Private Browsing, various ease-of-use improvements, switching to DAV1D as its AV1 video decoder, FIDO U2F API support, security fixes, and various JavaScript API additions.

  • Firefox 67 released

    The Mozilla blog takes a look at the Firefox 67 release.

Firefox 67 Is Here, And It’s “Faster Than Ever”

  • Firefox 67 Is Here, And It’s “Faster Than Ever”

    A brand new version of the Mozilla Firefox web-browser is now available to download, and the release is being dubbed the ‘fastest yet’.

    Now, granted, every other release of Firefox seems to carry a similar claim, although few have felt as unequivocally speedy as the Quantum release in 2017.

    But in Firefox 67 the speed boosts are palpable.

These Weeks in Firefox and Firefox 67 Now Available

Mozilla Firefox 67 Web Browser Officially Released

  • Mozilla Firefox 67 Web Browser Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Mozilla Firefox 67 comes with numerous performance improvements and new features to make your Firefox browsing experience better. To improve the overall performance, Mozilla did a few internal changes, such as to lower the priority of the "setTimeout" function during loading of web pages, delayed the component initialization until after Firefox's start up, as well as to suspend unused tabs.

    A key feature of the Firefox 67 release, which most users will love, it's a built-in cryptominer blocker, which blocks fingerprinters as well. You can find it in the Custom settings page of the Content Blocking preferences, so if you notice that your Firefox web browser eats too much RAM and CPU, try enabling these functions immediately and restart the web browser.

Now in Softpedia

  • Mozilla Firefox 67 Web Browser Officially Released, Here's What's New

    After a one-week delay due to a major issue with its add-ons mechanism, Open Source company Mozilla officially released the Firefox 67 cross-platform web browser today for Windows, Linux, Mac, and Android.
    Mozilla Firefox 67 comes with numerous performance improvements and new features to make your Firefox browsing experience better. To improve the overall performance, Mozilla did a few internal changes, such as to lower the priority of the "setTimeout" function during loading of web pages, delayed the component initialization until after Firefox's start up, as well as to suspend unused tabs.

    A key feature of the Firefox 67 release, which most users will love, it's a built-in cryptominer blocker, which blocks fingerprinters as well. You can find it in the Custom settings page of the Content Blocking preferences, so if you notice that your Firefox web browser eats too much RAM and CPU, try enabling these functions immediately and restart the web browser.

Mozilla Firefox 67 Is Now Available for Ubuntu Releases

  • Mozilla Firefox 67 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Linux Releases

    The Firefox 67 web browser arrived on May 21st, 2019, and promises to be the fastest Firefox release to date thanks to the numerous internal performance improvements implemented by Mozilla. Firefox 67 also comes with a built-in crypto miner and fingerprinter blocker, and a much-improved Private Browsing mode.

    One of the coolest new features of the Firefox 67 web browser is the ability to finally run different builds of Firefox at the same time. As such, users can now install and run the Firefox stable, beta, and nightly versions all side by side, or install and use both the latest stable and the ESR (Extended Support Release) version simultaneously.

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