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Sad News - Martin Schwidefsky

Filed under
Obits

We are devastated by the tragic death of Martin Schwidefsky who died
in an accident last Saturday.

Martin was the most significant contributor to the initial s390 port
of the Linux Kernel and later the maintainer of the s390 architecture
backend. His technical expertise as well as his mentoring skills were
outstanding. Martin was well known for his positive mindset and his
willingness to help.

He will be greatly missed.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora, CNCF and IBM-Paid Puff Pieces

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Some Interesting Features In VLC and Typical FUD From Bogdan Popa

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Review: HexagonOS 1.0

On the whole, Hexagon worked well for me. Hardware support was solid, performance was above average, the included applications worked well, and the settings were easy to adjust. I had very few complaints - just two really: my keyboard layout had to be adjusted and Hexagon did not automatically work well with VirtualBox. However, both of these issues were easily addressed. With that being said, Hexagon appears to bring relatively little, technologically, to the experience over its parent. While running this distribution I sometimes forgot that I was not simply running Xubuntu with a dock installed. The custom utilities Hexagon provides (the software centre and the backup tool) both function, but are quite limited in what they can do for the user and this makes me disinclined to use them over other solutions like Deja Dup and GNOME Software. It's probably too soon to judge what HexagonOS will become. Right now it's just at its 1.0 release, and appears to be a first attempt to take Xubuntu and customize it with a few changes. Hopefully future versions will try more new things, polish the custom applications and distinguish the distribution from its parent. Read more

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Everybody knows that sysadmins are impossibly busy people. Consequently, it sometimes seems they are superhuman. The sysadmin's dirty secret, the same one shared by many open source users, is that they don't actually do all of the work it looks like they've done. One of the greatest tools in the sysadmin's kit is their ability to reuse work someone else has already done for them. A good sysadmin knows where to turn when there's a big job to be done but nobody available to do it. If you're looking to work smarter, not harder, this is for you: a list of the top 10 resources every sysadmin should know about. Read more