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The Huawei Ban: Will Linux Replace Windows On Future Huawei Laptops?

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Microsoft

As I write this, Bloomberg has learned that other U.S-based tech giants like Intel, Qualcomm and Broadcom will cut off their supply of components to Huawei. Losing access to Intel processors will obviously affect future Huawei laptops, but what about the operating system Huawei will ship on these devices? What about the installation of Windows 10 you currently have on your Huawei laptop?

[...]

Linux Out Of The Box?

We know that Huawei has prepared for this situation by developing its own in-house alternative operating systems to both Android and Windows, though the state of said development is unknown.

Its Windows alternative is almost certainly a custom Linux distribution. And it's not far-fetched to speculate that Huawei has it playing nicely on its own processors.

Read more

Huawei's "plan B" smartphone OS: What it needs to succeed

  • Huawei's "plan B" smartphone OS: What it needs to succeed

    Vultures have been circling Huawei with a renewed fervor over the past six months, with flimsy claims of backdoors and the arrest of CFO Meng Wanzhou in Canada last December. Last week, President Trump signed an executive order restricting US firms from doing business with the world's third largest smartphone manufacturer—prompting Google to suspend Huawei's use of Play Services, a component that delivers Google's proprietary services on Android devices.

    Likewise, US-based chipmakers Intel, Qualcomm, Broadcom, Qorvo, Xilinx, Micron, and Western Digital have halted shipments following the order. German semiconductor manufacturer Infineon similarly stopped shipments temporarily to assess compliance requirements. While Huawei has reportedly kept a supply of chips on hand under the expectation of sanctions—and their HiSilicon division makes them better positioned to weather this storm than ZTE was when subjected to sanctions last May—the company is still extensively reliant on software and hardware from the US.

Windows ban? Huawei laptops disappear from Microsoft Store

  • Windows ban? Huawei laptops disappear from Microsoft Store

    Huawei laptops running Windows appear to have disappeared from the Microsoft Store online, following the decision by the US Commerce Department to put the Chinese firm on a list that forces it to seek permission to buy American products.

Huawei’s Android Alternative

  • Huawei’s Android Alternative OS Will Arrive This Fall, Says CEO

    The brewing trade war between the US and China has resulted in Google revoking Huawei’s Android license and barring it from using popular Google services such as the Play Store and Google apps.

    A recent report by Reuters suggests that the restrictions have been softened and a temporary license has been provided to Huawei to ensure that existing users do not face any issues.

  • U.S. eases curbs on Huawei; founder says clampdown underestimates Chinese firm

    The United States has temporarily eased trade restrictions on China’s Huawei to minimize disruption for its customers, a move the founder of the world’s largest telecoms equipment maker said meant little because it was already prepared for U.S. action.

    The U.S. Commerce Department blocked Huawei Technologies Co Ltd from buying U.S. goods last week, a major escalation in the trade war between the world’s two top economies, saying the firm was involved in activities contrary to national security.

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