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Debian: DebConf19, David Kalnischkies and Joey Hess

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Debian
  • Lenovo Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19

    With this commitment as Platinum Sponsor, Lenovo is contributing to make possible our annual conference, and directly supporting the progress of Debian and Free Software, helping to strengthen the community that continues to collaborate on Debian projects throughout the rest of the year.

  • David Kalnischkies: Newbie contributor: A decade later

    Time flies. On this day, 10 years ago, a certain someone sent in his first contribution to Debian in Debbugs#433007: --dry-run can mark a package manually installed (in real life). What follows is me babbling randomly about what lead to and happened after that first patch.

    That wasn't my first contribution to open source: I implemented (more like copy-pasted) mercurial support in the VCS plugin in the editor I was using back in 2008: Geany – I am pretty sure my code is completely replaced by now, I just remain being named in THANKS, which is very nice considering I am not a user anymore. My contributions to apt were coded in vim(-nox) already.

  • Joey Hess: 80 percent

    I added dh to debhelper a decade ago, and now Debian is considering making use of dh mandatory. Not being part of Debian anymore, I'm in the position of needing to point out something important about it anyway. So this post is less about pointing in a specific direction as giving a different angle to think about things.

    debhelper was intentionally designed as a 100% solution for simplifying building Debian packages. Any package it's used with gets simplified and streamlined and made less a bother to maintain. The way debhelper succeeds at 100% is not by doing everything, but by being usable in little pieces, that build up to a larger, more consistent whole, but that can just as well be used sparingly.

    dh was intentionally not designed to be a 100% solution, because it is not a collection of little pieces, but a framework. I first built an 80% solution, which is the canned sequences of commands it runs plus things like dh_auto_build that guess at how to build any software. Then I iterated to get closer to 100%. The main iteration was override targets in the debian/rules file, to let commands be skipped or run out of order or with options. That closed dh's gap by a further 80%.

Lenovo Hooks Up With Debian For DebConf 19

  • Lenovo Hooks Up With Debian For DebConf 19

    Usually taking the top spot for DebConf sponsoring is the likes of Intel, HP Enterprise, or Google (to which the search/Android giant is back again this year at the platinum level). Interestingly, however, Lenovo has made the plunge to DebConf and have committed to being a platinum sponsor for this upcoming Debian GNU/Linux event. Platinum sponsors contribute at least $20,000 USD to Debian for the event.

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