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Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo - Rather solid

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KDE
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Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo is a pretty solid distribution. It does have some rough edges and some glaring problems, like the Samba connectivity, the hiccup or three with the smartphones, the language localization, and the Dolphin icon thingie. But then, it also brings in a whole basket of nice polishes, improvements and fresh, original features, which balance out the rough patches.

Best of all, the ugly stuff can be tweaked and sorted out, which begs the question why did the distro ship with these by default? It wouldn't take much to spit-polish everything to perfection. Anyway, Plasma remains pretty and smart and slick, the system is fast and responsive and stable, you get a good bundle of programs, and it's a genuine enjoyment using this distribution. Given the fact 19.04 is a test bed of sorts, much like Zesty was, the level of fun is surprisingly high. But it does make me happy. Once again, I'm cautiously hopeful and optimistic, but even more so than I was with Cosmic. 8.5/10, so better prep them thumb drives for an adventure.

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No KDE Applications 19.04.1 available in flathub

  • No KDE Applications 19.04.1 available in flathub

    The flatpak and flathub developers have changed what they consider a valid appdata file, so our appdata files that were valid last month are not valid anymore and thus we can't build the KDE Applications 19.04.1 packages.

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