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Intel rolls out Clear Linux Developer Edition

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Linux

Specifically, here's what Intel is bringing to the open-source table.

Clear Linux is a rolling-release Linux distribution. While keeping close to the main Linux kernel, Intel has optimized its release for performance and security on its x86 platforms. While it can be used in all of Linux's usual roles, it's designed for cloud and container use.

The new installer brings Clear Linux into the 21st century. The earlier installer was, to be kind, obsolete. Clear Linux still uses the Intel-specific swupd update and package manager. This is different enough from other Linux distros that it will puzzle many users until they master it.

In the new developer edition, besides giving developers a Linux designed to make the most of Intel hardware, its basic programmer bundles are curated to provide all the relevant developer tools with one installation command, For example, `c-basic` for developing in C, and `containers-basic` for container programmers.

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Intel's Clear Linux OS Gets New Developer Edition And Installer

  • Intel's Clear Linux OS Gets New Developer Edition And Installer

    Intel's primary goal with Clear Linux -- which is built from scratch -- is to provide a rolling release distribution optimized for security and performance. And performance is a the big hook. It's tuned for Intel platforms with optimizations automatically switched on, and those optimizations run through the entire stack. (Take a look at any benchmark results at Phoronix and you'll frequently see Clear Linux beating every other distribution in multiple workloads, and even edging past Windows 10 Pro).

Intel's Clear Linux OS Now Offers Workflows Tailored for Linux

  • Intel's Clear Linux OS Now Offers Workflows Tailored for Linux Developers

    While Clear Linux OS isn't as popular as Ubuntu, Debian, or Arch Linux, it always proved to be a viable and quite fast Linux-based operating system for desktop and server users, offering them the best performance possible on the Intel Architecture. Clear Linux OS follows a rolling-release model where you install once and receive updates forever.

    Clear Linux OS always wanted to be the Linux distribution for developers, but now Intel has announced new images, an updated installer, software store, and forum all dedicated to make its open-source operating system a playground for Linux developers of all sizes, genres, and ages, offering them curated content for the best development efficiency possible.

Intel Unveils Clear Linux OS

Clear Linux From Intel Brings Best Performance On Intel CPUs

  • Clear Linux From Intel Brings Best Performance On Intel CPUs

    When I first came across Clear Linux about two years ago, the information available on the project was limited. It was simply being called Intel’s custom distribution that will offer the best Linux support on Intel hardware in cloud deployments. As developers were also working to add support for Steam, gamers also expected to get a great gaming performance out of it.

    Over the course of the past two years, the Chipzilla kept on improving the hardware support and the overall performance of Clear Linux. In the latest development, at its Open Source Technology Summit, Intel announced the release of Clear Linux Developer Edition. This was the first year Intel opened its private event to customers and the media.

More Intel "marketing"

  • Clear Linux Is Beginning To Make Strides In The Industry From Alibaba To MontaVista

    Of Intel's many open-source projects, taking a central role at this year's Intel Open-Source Technology Summit was Clear Linux. Most Intel open-source efforts mentioned during the event point back to Clear Linux in some capacity and at OSTS2019 we finally heard some of the companies that are beginning to make use of Clear Linux.

    While we have been benchmarking Clear Linux for the past few years nearly since its inception and have most often been mesmerized by its performance, it hasn't been very clear who in the industry makes use of Clear. In fact, the public vision of Clear Linux wasn't entirely clear until this week's event from various sessions and conversations with Intel's leaders.

  • Intel’s Clear Linux + The FOSS Contribution Project | Choose Linux 9

    Practically overnight, Intel’s Clear Linux OS has turned into a distribution worth paying attention to. But is it ready for regular desktop Linux users?

    Plus, Jason goes down yet another awesome rabbit hole with a new project on GitHub aimed at giving back to the Linux and open source community.

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    No disclosure has beeen made regarding how much of a payment is being requested, though given recent attacks on other states the amount is likely to be eye-watering. Also absent is any information on which ‘local government entities’ have been affected.

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    However, keep in mind that not only tools but also underlying processes and organization are important. You must know where log files are stored, how they are created and how long information is available. This requires a basic security concept. Understand the structure of your log files, and use customization of logging rules if available.

Chromebooks Switching Over To The BFQ I/O Scheduler

On Chromebooks when moving to the latest Chrome OS that switches over to a Linux 4.19 based kernel, BFQ has become the default I/O scheduler. BFQ has been maturing nicely and as of late there's been an uptick in interest around this I/O scheduler with some also calling for it to be used by default in distributions. Google has decided BFQ is attractive enough to enable by default for Chromebooks to provide better responsiveness. Read more

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  • salsa.debian.org: Postmortem of failed Docker registry move

    The Salsa admin team provides the following report about the failed migration of the Docker container registry. The Docker container registry stores Docker images, which are for example used in the Salsa CI toolset. This migration would have moved all data off to Google Cloud Storage (GCS) and would have lowered the used file system space on Debian systems significantly. [...] On 2019-08-06 the migration process was started. The migration itself went fine, although it took a bit longer than anticipated. However, as not all parts of the migration had been properly tested, a test of the garbage collection triggered a bug in the software. On 2019-08-10 the Salsa admins started to see problems with garbage collection. The job running it timed out after one hour. Within this timeframe it not even managed to collect information about all used layers to see what it can cleanup. A source code analysis showed that this design flaw can't be fixed. On 2019-08-13 the change was rolled back to storing data on the file system.

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