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Solaris: OmniOS CE and OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04

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  • OmniOS Community Edition r151030 LTS

    The OmniOS Community Edition Association is proud to announce the general availability of OmniOS - r151030.

    OmniOS is published according to a 6-month release cycle, r151030 LTS takes over from r151028, published in November 2018; and since it is a LTS release it also takes over from r151022. The r151030 LTS release will be supported for 3 Years. It is the first LTS release published by the OmniOS CE Association since taking over the reins from OmniTI in 2017. The next LTS release is scheduled for May 2021. The old stable r151026 release is now end-of-life. See the release schedule for further details.

  • Solaris/Illumos-Based OmniOS Ships New LTS Release With Better Hardware Support

    While open-source operating system projects derived from the former "OpenSolaris" code now maintained by the Illumos community aren't exactly prolific these days, one of the projects that does continue cranking through and seeing commercial success as well is OmniOS. OmniOS r151030 was released this week in its "Community Edition" flavor with various improvements.

    OmniOS CE r151030 is the latest six-month update to this OpenSolaris-derived operating system and will be supported for three years as the first LTS release managed by the OmniOS CE Association.

  • OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04 Brings MATE 1.22, More Python 3 Porting

    It seems to be the season of open-source Solaris operating system updates... In addition to a new OmniOS LTS release for that Illumos-derived platform, OpenIndiana Hipster has issued its newest quarterly update.

    OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04 is available as the latest snapshot of this operating system that traces back to the once promising Sun OpenSolaris. With OpenIndiana 2019.04 there is an updated Firefox ESR package, VirtualBox packages are now available including for the guest components, the default MATE desktop pulled in its 1.22 components, IPS has seen updates, and some OpenIndiana applications have been ported from Python 2 and GTK2 over to Python 3 and GTK3.

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Open Invention Network, the Linux-based patent non-aggression community, exceeds 3,000 licensees

OIN's mission is to enable Linux, its related software, and its programmers to develop and monetize without being hogtied by patent fights. In Linux's early years, this was a constant threat. Now, thanks largely to the OIN's efforts to get everyone to agree on the basic open-source principle -- that's it's better and more profitable to share than to cling to proprietary property -- open-source software has taken off in the marketplace. The OIN isn't the first to take this concept and apply it to the Unix/Linux operating system family. After Novell bought Unix from AT&T, rather than keep fighting with Berkeley Software Design Inc. (BSDO) over possible Unix IP rights violations in BSD/OS, an early, commercial BSD Unix, Noorda famously declared that he'd rather compete in the marketplace than in court. This Unix case was settled in 1994. That was a one off. The OIN, which has grown by 50% in the last two years, has turned patent non-aggression into policy for thousands of companies. By agreeing to the OIN license, members gain access to patented inventions worth hundreds of millions of dollars while promoting a favorable environment for Linux and related open source software. Read more

today's howtos

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It
    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.
  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam
    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.
  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage
    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs. Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?