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All Chromebooks will also be Linux laptops going forward

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Linux

At Google I/O in Mountain View, Google quietly let slip that "all devices [Chromebook] launched this year will be Linux-ready right out of the box." Wait. What?

In case you've missed it, last year, Google started making it possible to run desktop Linux on Chrome OS. Since then, more Chromebook devices are able to run Linux. Going forward, all of them will be able to do so, too. Yes. All of them. ARM and Intel-based.

This isn't surprising. Chrome OS, after all, is built on Linux. Chrome OS started as a spin off of Ubuntu Linux. It then migrated to Gentoo Linux and evolved into Google's own take on the vanilla Linux kernel. But its interface remains the Chrome web browser UI -- to this day.

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You'll Soon Be Able to Run Linux Apps on Any Chromebook

  • You'll Soon Be Able to Run Linux Apps on Any Chromebook

    Microsoft announced this week that it will bring the heart of the open source operating system Linux into Windows. Not to be outdone, Google says all future Chromebooks will be able to run Linux applications.

    Chromebooks run an operating system, ChromeOS, that is built on the Linux kernel but was originally designed to only run Google's web browser Chrome. That meant you could only really use web apps. That changed in 2016 when Google announced support for installing apps written for its other Linux-based operating system, Android. Then last year the company unveiled a feature called Crostini that enables users to install other Linux apps as well. But Crostini was supported on only a few Chromebooks, such as Google's flagship Pixelbook. At its I/O developer conference this week, ZDnet reports, Google announced that all new Chromebooks will support Crostini.

More from SJVN about GNU/Linux

2019 Is the Year of Linux on the Desktop

  • 2019 Is the Year of Linux on the Desktop

    The year of Linux on the desktop is finally here! Windows 10 is getting a Linux kernel, and all new Chromebooks will run Linux applications. Most desktops purchased in the future will include a Linux kernel and run Linux software.

It Just Got A Whole Lot Easier To Buy A GNU/Linux Notebook…

  • It Just Got A Whole Lot Easier To Buy A GNU/Linux Notebook…

    I’ve checked out what’s on Amazon.ca and there are a bunch of ChromeBooks offered but it’s a bit of a challenge to sort out the ARMed from the Intel. I hate Intel because they are part of the Wintel monopoly and I hate AMD because it’s the same bloated instruction-set. Unfortunately, all the ARMed models I could find were very pricey and/or using very old CPUs like the year before last year. Still they are ARMed notebooks in every price-range and some are 28nm with 4 to 6 cores and 4GB RAM. They make a decent desktop computer for one. They should leave my old smartphone in the dust. Lightweight and portable they are too. Most of all, they are widely available. Is anyone in the retail sector not selling them?

Chrome OS 76 will make it easier to enable GPU acceleration

  • Chrome OS 76 will make it easier to enable GPU acceleration for Linux on Chromebooks

    A select few Chrome OS devices can now use GPU hardware acceleration for Linux, but the feature is currently enabled through a specific command line when starting up the virtual machine for a Linux container. The Chromium team has an open bug to address this by making it easier to enable and is currently targeting Chrome OS 76 for the solution.

Google says all new Chromebooks will be Linux-ready

  • Google says all new Chromebooks will be Linux-ready

    One of the biggest announcements from this year's Google I/O related to the Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL, but this was far from being all there was to get excited about. Microsoft may be increasingly embracing Linux in Windows 10, and Google is doing the same with Linux on Chromebooks.

    Support for Linux apps on Chromebook is nothing new, but Google has now announced that all Chromebooks that launch from this point forward will be fully functional Linux laptops, regardless of whether they are ARM or Intel devices.

Slashdot now

  • Is It Finally the Year of 'Linux on the Desktop' ?

    But most people won't know it. That's because the bones of the open-source operating system kernel will soon be baked into Windows 10 and Chrome OS, as Microsoft and Google revealed at their respective developer conferences this week... Between lurking in Windows 10 and Chrome OS, and the tiny portion of actual Linux distro installs, pretty much any PC you pick up will run a Linux kernel and Linux software.

2019 the "year of the desktop". PC

All Chromebooks Will Support Linux Going Forward

As if Crouton never existed...

  • Google Brings Linux to Chromebook

    Linux based Chrombooks are not capable of natively running Linux apps and utilities. Last year Google launched project Crostini to allow Linux apps – primarily command line tools and utilities to run natively on ChromeOS using containerization.

    According to some media reports, at the Google I/O summit this year, Google announced that “all Chromebooks launched in 2019 will be Linux-ready right out of the box.” It means all new Chromebooks will have Crostini enabled by default.

    “Crostini is the umbrella term for making Linux application support easy to use and integrating well with Chrome OS. It largely focuses on getting you a Terminal with a container with easy access to install whatever developer-focused tools you might want. It’s the default first-party experience,” said the Project Crostini page.

New Chromebooks starting this year will be Linux-ready

  • New Chromebooks starting this year will be Linux-ready

    If you missed a heartbeat, that’s okay, but you read it right. Google has made an announcement that all Chromebooks launched this year onwards will be Linux-ready right out of the box.

    For those not aware, Chrome OS is built on Linux, which began as a Ubuntu spin-off and later migrated to Gentoo Linux. It then evolved using Google’s own Linux vanilla kernel.

    Installing Linux on Chromebook isn’t new. Since 2013, Linux applications can be run in Chrome OS using Crouton, a third-party set of scripts that allows access to a Linux distribution. Crouton lets you run side-by-side Chrome OS and Ubuntu, eliminating the need to boot one operating system at a time. Additionally, in 2018, Google announced that Linux desktop apps were officially coming to Chrome OS.

“Embrace”... Extend, extinguish?

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