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KDE: Linux App Summit 2019, Okular and Krita

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KDE
  • Bring the Linux App Summit 2019 home

    The GNOME and KDE communities are looking for locations for the Linux App Summit (LAS) 2019, an event that will be held sometime between September and December 2019.

    The Linux App Summit is an evolution of the Libre Application Summit and has a specific focus on the creation of applications that target Linux devices. By co-hosting the conference, KDE and GNOME want to create a space for a more widespread collaboration and work towards a common goal: make the Linux application ecosystem flourish.

    If you are interested in hosting LAS 2019 in your town, send us an e-mail to appsummit@lists.freedesktop.org by May 15th with your proposed location. This will allow the organizing committee to establish contact with you and give you assistance as you put together a bid later on.

  • Rajeesh K Nambiar: Okular: improved PDF annotation tool

    Okular, KDE’s document viewer has very good support for annotating/reviewing/commenting documents. Okular supports a wide variety of annotation tools out-of-the-box (enable the ‘Review’ tool [F6] and see for yourself) and even more can be configured (such as the ‘Strikeout’ tool) — right click on the annotation tool bar and click ‘Configure Annotations’.

    One of the annotation tools me and my colleagues frequently wanted to use is a line with arrow to mark an indent. Many PDF annotating software have this tool, but Okular was lacking it.

    So a couple of weeks ago I started looking into the source code of okular and poppler (which is the PDF library used by Okular) and noticed that both of them already has support for the ‘Line Ending Style’ for the ‘Straight Line’ annotation tool (internally called the TermStyle). Skimming through the source code for a few hours and adding a few hooks in the code, I could add an option to configure the line ending style for ‘Straight Line’ annotation tool. Many line end styles are provided out of the box, such as open and closed arrows, circle, diamond etc.

  • Summer is coming...

    All of this began here, probably this was the first day I was giving Krita a try cause this was the closest I got to Photoshop after switching to Linux. It has been something on and off from that day, sometimes I used Krita, sometimes I mixed it up with GIMP and Inkscape too for satisfying my needs to replace the “Photoshop through Wine”.

    Until 2017 I was just a Krita user, but after installing Gentoo and getting comfortable with compiling programs on my own, I decided to contribute to Krita, cause it feels awesome when your work is being used by millions of people, right?

    So I headed over to their IRC channel, introduced me and told them my intentions, luckily, Scott was there to help me with the things I would love to work on and in a couple of days, I made my first patch to the new Text Tool. Cool, sounds perfect, except it wasn’t cause, that branch which I committed into will probably never get merged into master, why? why? (read them quickly one after another) For the reason that, I immediately left working on that part (even though I promised that I would work) after the first commit, god knows what I was thinking, such an idiot I was.

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