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Games: Farm Life, ProtoCorgi, Teeworlds, Sigma Theory: Global Cold War, Steam on Ubuntu 19.04, Optimizations For Mesa 19.1

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Gaming
  • Farm Life, the Match 3 game about restoring a farm has been released for Linux and it's lovely

    Great to see another Match 3 game on Linux with Farm Life, ported over by Bearded Giant Games as part of their Linux 1st Initiative.

    I had the pleasure of testing this one before releasing and it's sucked away hours from me! Not a genre I play too often, partly because there's not many good Match 3 games available on Linux, so for me this does fill a little hole. Although I will fully admit that I was horribly addicted to Candy Crush on Android a few years ago.

  • The shoot 'em up 'ProtoCorgi' now has an updated demo, which is also on Steam for Linux too

    In ProtoCorgi you're a pup that means business, serious business. You play as Bullet, a cybernetic pup on a quest to save your owner.

    Since I tested the original demo, it's had a pretty large update reworking some systems which you can find a full changelog of here. This Godot Engine powered shoot 'em up is very promising, so I'm looking forward to seeing the full game. What the demo offers is obviously quite short, as it's only meant as a taster of what's to come

  • Teeworlds, the classic free multiplayer platform battler is still being updated and it's looking good

    Teeworlds, a game that's been around for a great many years now continues to be improved and updated with another update pushed out recently.

    For those who've never played it, Teeworlds is a side-scrolling platform action game played online across various game modes like deathmatch, team deathmatch and capture the flag. It's free, it's also open source (GitHub) and if you manage to get a bunch of people together to play with, it can be seriously fun.

  • The near-future game of espionage 'Sigma Theory: Global Cold War' is out in Early Access

    Developed by Mi-Clos Studio (Out There) and Goblinz Studio (Robothorium, Dungeon Rushers), Sigma Theory: Global Cold War, a game about using special agents to attempt control of the world has entered Early Access with Linux support recently.

    In the near-future scientists made a discovery called the Sigma Theory, which could throw the world into complete chaos. Apparently it's capable of helping to create new weapons of insane power, as well as tools that could disrupt everything from the economy to the human mind. Sounds pretty wild, so naturally everyone wants a piece of the pie.

  • How to install Steam on Ubuntu 19.04

    In this video, we look at how to install Steam on Ubuntu 19.04.

  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Picks Up More Game Performance Optimizations For Mesa 19.1

    There is just one week to go until the Mesa 19.1 feature freeze and branching for this next quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers. Notable this round is the introduction of the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver for supporting Broadwell graphics and newer atop this next-gen OpenGL driver ahead of next year's Xe Graphics dGPU launch. With days to go until the Mesa 19.1 feature freeze, more performance optimizations have landed.

    Kenneth Graunke of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center who has led the Iris Gallium3D driver development for more than the past year pushed a number of notable improvements into Mesa Git today.

    iris: Track valid data range and infer unsynchronized mappings - On Skylake graphics this improves the FPS average for games like DiRT Rally, Bioshock Infinite, and Shadow of Mordor by 2~7% and the max FPS by as much as 9~20%.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Why Are Cryptographers Being Denied Entry into the US?

    Is there some cryptographer blacklist? Is something else going on? A lot of us would like to know.

  • Security Engineering: Third Edition

    Today I put online a chapter on Who is the Opponent, which draws together what we learned from Snowden and others about the capabilities of state actors, together with what we’ve learned about cybercrime actors as a result of running the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre. Isn’t it odd that almost six years after Snowden, nobody’s tried to pull together what we learned into a coherent summary?

    There’s also a chapter on Surveillance or Privacy which looks at policy. What’s the privacy landscape now, and what might we expect from the tussles over data retention, government backdoors and censorship more generally?

  • Google halts some business with China's Huawei: report

    Huawei will reportedly no longer be able to access Android updates, the Gmail app, the Google Play store and new versions of Google phones outside of China.

  • Google restricts Huawei's use of Android

    Existing Huawei smartphone users will be able to update apps and push through security fixes, as well as update Google Play services.

    But when Google launches the next version of Android later this year, it may not be available on Huawei devices.

    Future Huawei devices may no longer have apps such as YouTube and Maps.

  • Forget Huawei, The Internet Of Things Is The Real Security Threat
    We've noted for a while how a lot of the US protectionist security hysteria surrounding Huawei isn't supported by much in the way of hard data. And while it's certainly possible that Huawei helps the Chinese government spy, the reality is that Chinese (or any other) intelligence services don't really need to rely on Huawei to spy on the American public. Why? Because people around the world keep connecting millions of internet of broken things devices to their home and business networks that lack even the most rudimentary of security and privacy protections. Week after week we've documented how these devices are being built with both privacy and security as a distant afterthought, resulting in everything from your television to your refrigerator creating both new attack vectors and wonderful new surveillance opportunities for hackers and state actors.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

A Look At The MDS Cost On Xeon, EPYC & Xeon Total Impact Of Affected CPU Vulnerabilities

This weekend I posted a number of benchmarks looking at the performance impact of the new MDS/Zombieload vulnerabilities that also included a look at the overall cost of Spectre/Meltdown/L1TF/MDS on Intel desktop CPUs and AMD CPUs (Spectre). In this article are similar benchmarks but turning the attention now to Intel Xeon hardware and also comparing those total mitigation costs against AMD EPYC with its Spectre mitigations. This article offers a look at the MDS/Zombieload mitigations on a 1st Gen Skylake Xeon Scalable server as well as a Kabylake Xeon E3 server for reference. Following that is a look at the total CPU vulnerability mitigation costs for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable, 2nd Gen Xeon Scalable (Cascade Lake), and an AMD EPYC 2P server as well for its Spectre mitigations. As expected given Intel's guidance last week of their latest Xeon processors being mitigated for MDS, indeed, the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 Cascade Lake server reported it was not affected by the MDS mitigations and thus not enabled. So for the MDS tests up first it's just some reference results using a dual Xeon Gold 6138 Skylake server running Ubuntu 19.04 with the Linux 5.0 patched kernel and reference results side-by-side for a separate Xeon E3-1275 v6 server. Read more