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Binance Labs Grants $45,000 to 3 Open-Source Blockchain Startups

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  • Binance Labs Grants $45,000 to 3 Open-Source Blockchain Startups

    Binance Labs, the investment arm of cryptocurrency exchange Binance, has awarded grants of $15,000 each to three startups developing open-source blockchain technologies.

    Receiving the grants are Ironbelly, a mobile wallet for the Grin/Mimblewimble blockchain; HOPR, privacy-preserving messaging protocol; and Kitsune Wallet, an upgradeable on-chain wallet.

    The three startups are now the first “fellows” of Binance Labs’s Fellowship program, which funds and supports early-stage open-source development projects, according to a blog announcement Friday.

    According to Binance Labs director Flora Sun, innovation requires “an engaged community of developers and entrepreneurs who imagine ideas and create new projects to bring products to market.”

  • Binance Labs Gives $45k To Three Open-Source Projects

    According to the post, the firm has given at least $15,000 to each of its first three open-source Fellowship projects. The very first one is Ironbelly, which is basically an open-source mobile wallet specifically designed for the Grin blockchain. It aims to give customers the ability to both hold and transfer Gin crypto between individuals.

  • Binance Labs Grants $45,000 to Three Open-Source Projects

    Binance Labs, the investment arm of major cryptocurrency exchange Binance, has granted $45,000 to three different projects. The news was announced in a blog post on Friday, April 12.
    Per the post, Binance Labs has contributed $15,000 to each of its first three open-source Fellowship projects. The first project is Ironbelly, an open-source mobile wallet for the Grin blockchain that aims to enable customers to hold and transfer Grin cryptocurrency between people.

  • Binance Labs supports 3 Open-Source Blockchain Startups by offering $45,000

    Binance Labs, the investment arm of big cryptocurrency market Binance, has given $45,000 to 3 distinct jobs. The information was declared at a blog article on Friday, April 12.

    Per the article, Binance Labs has donated $15,000 to each of its three accessible Fellowship jobs. The first job is Ironbelly, an open-source portable pocket for its Grin blockchain which intends to allow clients to hold and move Grin cryptocurrency involving individuals.

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