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GhostBSD 19.04 Release Switches To LightDM, Based On FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT

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BSD

With TrueOS (formerly PC-BSD) shifting away from its desktop FreeBSD focus, the GhostBSD project remains one of the nice "desktop BSD" operating system offerings. GhostBSD 19.04 is now available in MATE and Xfce desktop spins.

GhostBSD 19.04 is based on FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT while officially using the MATE desktop but also providing a community Xfce desktop image. GhostBSD 19.04 switches to LightDM as its display/log-in manager, supports ZFS now when using the MBR mode in the installer, drops gksu, and has a number of bug fixes especially to its installer among other packages.

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Also: t2k19 Hackathon Report: Stefan Sperling on 802.11? progress, suspend/resume and more

GhostBSD 19.04 Now Available

  • GhostBSD 19.04 Now Available

    Finally, GhostBSD 19.04 is out! GhostBSD 19.04 has several improvements from the volume controller to the installer, and for the first time, we added and changed some code in the base system. GhostBSD 19.04 is available with our official MATE desktop, and there is also a community Xfce desktop version available. This release is a significant improvement from GhostBSD 18.12. Enjoy!

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