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Stack Overflow's Developer Survey Results

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Development
  • Developer Survey Results

    This year, nearly 90,000 developers told us how they learn and level up, which tools they’re using, and what they want.

  • Programming languages: Developers reveal most loved, most loathed, what pays best

    Developer knowledge-sharing site Stack Overflow has released its 2019 annual developer survey, revealing the most popular programming languages and which languages are linked to the highest salaries worldwide and in the US.

    If you're a programmer who loves Rust, Python, and TypeScript, you're not alone, according Stack Overflow's 2019 survey, which asked 90,000 developers around the world what their most loved, dreaded, and wanted languages were.

JavaScript Is The Most Popular Programming Language

  • JavaScript Is The Most Popular Programming Language: Stack Overflow Survey

    Developers and programming enthusiasts eagerly await the results of the annual Stack Overflow survey every year. It’s the world’s largest and most comprehensive survey to involve programmers and their preferences. The 2019 edition of this survey touched about 90,000 developers and the results are finally here.

    In this article, I’ll be particularly focusing on the most popular programming languages and technologies being used today. This will be followed by a series of other articles in the upcoming days that’ll discuss other aspects of the survey.

Microsoft Petet's slant on it

More on this aurvey

  • 2019 Stack Overflow survey: A quick overview

    The results of the 2019 Stack Overflow survey have just been published: 90,000 developers took the 20-minute survey this year. The survey shed light on some very interesting insights – from the developers’ preferred language for programming, to the development platform they hate the most, to the blockers to developer productivity.

    As the survey is quite detailed and comprehensive, here’s a quick look at the most important takeaways.

By Sean Michael Kerner

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