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DXVK 1.1 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • DXVK, the Vulkan-based layer for Direct3D 10/11 in Wine has a major 1.1 release out now

    DXVK, the awesome project that has helped push Linux gaming further has a new release out and it sounds pretty huge.

    Firstly, for Unreal Engine 4 titles (and several other unnamed games) DXVK 1.1 has "Queries" re-implemented which should allow for improved GPU utilization. The feature is widely used apparently, so it may help quite a number of games. DXVK also now comes with basic support for Predication based on the new query stuffs.

    Another major difference is that DXVK 1.1 uses "in-memory compression for shader code", which should result in games with a large number of shaders seeing reduced memory utilization. However, it may increase shader compile times "slightly". Games noted to benefit include Overwatch, Quake Champions and Dishonored 2 seeing "several hundred Megabytes of RAM" savings.

  • DXVK 1.1 Released With Vulkan Queries Work, Other Improvements

    DXVK 1.1 is out this weekend in time for some weekend Linux game testing. This library, which is used for implementing Direct3D 10/11 over Vulkan for the benefit of Windows games running on Linux under Wine/Proton (Steam Play), has new abilities and performance enhancements with today's update.

    DXVK 1.1 has performance improvements around Unreal Engine 4 games and other titles thanks to better GPU utilization via Vulkan queries. To benefit, systems need Wine 4.5+ or Proton 4.2+ and be running the NVIDIA 418.49.4 driver or Mesa 19.1-devel Git. There is also initial and basic support for predication via VK_EXT_conditional_rendering.

DXVK 1.1 rereleased

  • DXVK 1.0.3 Released Following The Recalled DXVK 1.1

    While DXVK 1.1 was released earlier this month, it ultimately was recalled due to game crashes and GPU hangs that are still being investigated. For now, DXVK 1.0.3 has been released as the latest and greatest version of this library for translating Direct3D 10/11 calls to make use of the Vulkan graphics API for Windows gaming on Linux with Wine/Proton.

    DXVK 1.0.3 back-ports some of the v1.1 material like exposing version information within the DXVK DLLs. There are also bug fixes in DXVK 1.0.3 around geometric shaders, passing of undefined data causing unexpected shader cache misses, and gracefully handling surface loss.

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