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Jolla and Purism on Their Platforms (GNU/Linux-based OS)

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  • A Message in a Bottle – from the Mer Project

    I am pleased to announce a significant change in Mer and Sailfish OS which will be implemented in phases. As many of you know Mer began many years ago as a way for the community to demonstrate “working in the open” to Nokia. This succeeded well enough that Mer eventually closed down and shifted support to MeeGo. When MeeGo stopped – thanks to its open nature – we, Carsten Munk and I, were able to reincarnate Mer as an open community project and continue to develop a core OS and a suite of open development tools around it. Over time a number of organisations used the Mer core as a base for their work. However, there was one that stood out: Jolla with Sailfish OS which started to use Mer core in its core and they have been by far the most consistent contributors and supporters of Mer.
    Once again, Mer has served it’s purpose and can retire. To clarify that this will be the official ‘working in the open’ core of SailfishOS we’re going to gradually merge merproject.org and sailfishos.org.

    What will this mean in practice?
    I’d like to just say that the colours of the websites will change and we’ll be able to access the existing resources using new sailfishos.org links.
    So whilst that summary is true, actually it’s more complex than that! Yes, the same hardware will run the same services and Jolla’s sailors will continue to push code to the same systems. There will be more time to keep the servers updated and to improve community contribution mechanisms.

  • The Future of Computing and Why You Should Care

    As technology gets closer and closer to our brain, the moral issues of digital rights become clearer and clearer.

    It started with computers, where we would leave them and come back to them. Then phones, that we always have on or near us with millisecond leakage of personal data beyond human comprehension. Then wearables, that are tracking very private details. IOT devices are everywhere— I have to stop to remind everybody: “The S in IOT is for Security” ~ Anonymous—and finally, surgically implanted.

    A question to consider: What Big Tech Company would you purchase your future brain implant from? This is coming.

    However, I believe we can change the future of computing for the better. Let’s stand together and invest, use, and recommend products and services that respect society.

Belated coverage by Michael Larabel

  • Mer Project Merging With Sailfish OS

    Mer, the fork of MeeGo that aimed to provide a free alternative to Maemo for Nokia devices, is now finally merging with Sailfish OS.

    Jolla's Sailfish OS already was based on Mer albeit with the proprietary UI and other components added in. Mer meanwhile hasn't seen too much work recently and now mostly in name is merging with Jolla's Sailfish OS.

Mer Project and Sailfish OS are merging

  • Mer Project and Sailfish OS are merging (open source, Linux-based mobile operating systems)

    Mer is an open source GNU/Linux operating system designed for mobile devices. Sailfish OS, the operating system that Jolla develops for smartphones, is probably the most popular operating system based on Mer (which isn’t really saying very much). And the two projects have been closely intertwined from the get go.

    So it’s not exactly a huge surprise that Jolla and Mer have announced that they’re merging Mer and Sailfish OS.

    What does this mean for users? Not much really. On the back end, some changes will be made to servers, and users and developers may want to create some new accounts.

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