Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

EU praises M$ plan, to market test

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft won praise on Monday for its proposal to comply with interoperability demands by the European Union's antitrust watchdog, which said the plan would now be put to industry peers for their opinion.

The U.S. software giant could be hit with a fine of up to $5 million a day if the European Commission concludes that its proposals would not allow non-Microsoft work group servers to achieve full interoperability with Windows PC and servers.

But the EU executive voiced satisfaction, even though the sticky question of "open source" licenses was not fully resolved to the Commission's liking.

"I am happy that Microsoft has recognized certain principles which must underlie its implementation of the Commission's decision," European Competition Commissioner Neelie Kroes said in a statement.

In addition to agreeing to allow the development and sale of interoperable products on a worldwide basis, Microsoft has also recognized that "a category of the information which it is obliged to disclose" will be royalty-free.

However, the Commission said Microsoft considers that the software source code developed by recipients of interoperability information that implements the company's protocols should not be published under a so-called open source license.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

New Releases

Notifications Without User Interaction on Ubuntu Are Annoying

The Unity desktop environment has a simple and rather ineffective system notification mechanism and it looks like that's not going to change, not even with the arrival of Unity 8. Read more

Librem Linux Laptop Drops NVIDIA Graphics But Still Coming Up Short Of Goal

One of the oddest things I found about the crowd-funded Librem 15 laptop when writing about it last month was that it wanted to be open-source down to the component firmware/microcode yet they opted to ship with a NVIDIA GPU. In an updated earlier this month, at least they came to their senses and dropped the discrete NVIDIA GPU. While I have no problems recommending NVIDIA graphics for Linux gamers and those wanting the best performance, that's only when using the proprietary drivers, and certainly wouldn't recommend it for a fully open-source system -- NVIDIA on the desktop side doesn't do much for the open-source drivers, let alone down to the firmware/microcode level. Instead the Librem folks have opted to upgrade the design to using an Intel Core i7 4770HQ processor that features more powerful Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics, which isn't as powerful as a discrete NVIDIA GPU but at least is more open-source friendly. Read more

Ruby 2.2.0 Released

We are pleased to announce the release of Ruby 2.2.0. Ruby 2.2 includes many new features and improvements for the increasingly diverse and expanding demands for Ruby. Read more