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Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

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Gaming
  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions

    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband.

    Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off.

    Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:

  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5

    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS.

    Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.

  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play

    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.

  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG

    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.

  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety

    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now.

    While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone

    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole.

    Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Leftovers: Blobs, Snapcraft and Arronax

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Bundle NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Packages As Part Of Its ISO
    For Ubuntu 19.10 the developers are adding the NVIDIA driver packages onto the ISO. The NVIDIA binary drivers won't be activated by default, but will be present on the install media to make it easier to enable post-install. The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" drivers will remain the default for NVIDIA graphics on new Ubuntu installations, but this change is positioning the mainline and legacy NVIDIA proprietary drivers onto the Ubuntu ISO so that they can be easily obtained locally post-install. The main driver here is allowing users to enable the NVIDIA proprietary graphics on Ubuntu even if you don't have an Internet connection. NVIDIA has already okay'ed the distribution of their driver packages with the Ubuntu ISO.
  • Snapcraft parts & plugins
    Last week, we published Introduction to snapcraft, a tutorial that provided a detailed overview of the snap build process. We touched on the concepts like snap ecosystem components, snapcraft command line, snapcraft.yaml syntax, and more. We’d like to expand on the first lesson, and today, we are going to talk about parts and plugins, used in the build process of snaps.
  • Arronax – Graphical Tool to Create Desktop Launcher in Ubuntu
    For those who want to manually create desktop shortcut launcher in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Arronax is a good choice with graphical user interface. Other than creating .desktop file via Linux command, Arronax offers a graphical interface to create (and also edit) desktop shortcut for application, executable file, or URL.

Games: Wine, IRKALLA, Vambrace: Cold Soul, ZED, and art of rally

  • Valve's Proton Pulls In Latest DXVK, Steam Networking Updates, Controller Layout Fixes
    The Valve developers maintaining their Proton fork of Wine for use by Steam Play have outed a new update, version 4.2-5.
  • Wine & Mingw-w64 Might Tighten Up Their Relationship - Possible "WineSDK"
    Developers between the Wine and Mingw-w64 projects are discussing the potential for further embracing their relationship given the overlap in trajectory and both benefiting from close collaboration. This extended relationship could also involve Mingw-w64 potentially adopting Wine's branding. While all Phoronix readers should be aware of Wine, for those not familiar with Mingw-w64 it's the off-shoot of MinGW focused on 64-bit support and other features over the original MinGW for providing an open-source development toolchain for Microsoft Windows. Mingw-w64 remains quite active in working on its GCC-based compiler toolchain support for Windows.
  • Wine and mingw-w64 cooperation
  • IRKALLA, an incredibly stylish looking pixel-art tactical-action platformer is coming to Linux
    The developers behind IRKALLA emailed in today and it grabbed my interest right away with the supremely stylish art behind it. The odd setting has my curiosity too, with mechs versus demons! According to the developer, it's a "platform-tactic game" so it has elements of an action platformer with character progression and some form of base defence building. IRKALLA has been in development for quite a few years now with their TIGForum post dating all the way back to 2013. We've been emailed today, as it seems development on it has been picked back up as they told me it's "finally coming together" and a Linux release is also confirmed of course.
  • Roguelike fantasy adventure 'Vambrace: Cold Soul' has a new feature trailer ahead of release next week
    The release of Vambrace: Cold Soul on May 28th is getting close now, it's quite an impressive looking game that I've been playing and they have a new feature trailer. I won't say too much on it myself before release but since I've had access for a while, I can say it works great on Linux.
  • Surreal adventure game 'ZED' about an artist suffering from dementia is releasing in June
    ZED, a game that will tell the story of an artist suffering from dementia from Eagre Games and Cyan Ventures now has a release date and it's quite soon. The Windows version is now scheduled in for June 4th, with the Linux (and Mac) version to be "later in June". Great to see it continue to be confirmed and although there is a delay, it's not going to be long it seems. Good thing too, as I'm damn excited for this one.
  • art of rally is bringing a stylized racing experience to Linux later this year
    Funselektor Labs, the developer of Absolute Drift has announced their latest game, art of rally. It might look stylish but it's not just a pretty face, as the developer is also focused on how the cars handle too. While we have a few racing games now like Grid Autosport, DiRT Rally/4 and some F1 games (plus a few that work with Steam Play), they're all quite serious business. art of rally looks to be taking a slightly less realistic focus while still providing a challenge, especially with the top-down view you get a better picture of what's up ahead.

Announcing Rust 1.35.0

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.35.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software. Read more Also: Rust 1.35 Released With Support For Empty Debug Macro, ~4x Faster ASCII Case Conversions

GNU Guile 2.9.2 (beta) released

We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.2, the second beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link. This release extends just-in-time (JIT) native code generation support to the ia32, ARMv7, and AArch64 architectures. Under the hood, we swapped out GNU Lightning for a related fork called Lightening, which was better adapted to Guile's needs. Read more