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SUSE: On SUSE OpenStack Cloud and 'The Internet of Things' (IoT)

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  • Keep an Open Mind in an Open Source World

    On the other hand, open source is emerging as the platform for innovation.  Open source is a vastly fertile landscape providing countless opportunities to share and expand.  I ask that you keep an open mind as we explore SUSE OpenStack Cloud and the beautiful synergy that it will create in your data center with VMware.

    You have spent years and possibly decades in building out your data center with the sprawling nature of VMware.  Implementing SUSE OpenStack Cloud means you continue to leverage your current assets, complementing them with an infrastructure that will prepare you or the future.

  • Is 2019 the Year IoT and Edge Computing Comes of Age?

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the hottest technology topics of the moment – and for very good reasons.  We all know we’re living in an increasingly interconnected world and are constantly looking for new ways to take full advantage of it.
    On a more personal level, our mobile smart devices have become our access point to the rapidly expanding digital universe surrounding us.  They are now so much a part of our lives that we tap, swipe or click our mobile phone an average of 2,617 times a day. That makes each of us an IoT end-point, as we progressively consume more information, data, and services. Our appetite is growing so fast that mobile data traffic is predicted to reach 930 exabytes by 2022, which is expected to be 20% of all IP traffic that year.
    It’s no wonder that every major IT analyst firm has been focused on IoT for some time and that they all have edge computing included in their top strategic technology predictions for 2019. IDC predicts that IoT spending will reach $745 billion this year and there will be 31 billion end-points (things) connected by 2022.

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