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Red Hat and SUSE: Drools, Systemd, Libinput, Fedora and Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0

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  • Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

    Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

  • Why feedback, not metrics, is critical to DevOps

    Most managers and agile coaches depend on metrics over feedback from their teams, users, and even customers. In fact, quite a few use feedback and metrics synonymously, where they present feedback from teams or customers as a bunch of numbers or a graphical representation of those numbers. This is not only unfortunate, but it can be misleading as it presents only part of the story and not the entire truth.

  • L2TP Tunnel Support Added To Systemd

    The newest feature addition for systemd is supporting L2TP, the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, as part of its networking code. 

    Systemd's networkd now has support merged for LT2TP tunnel support. L2TP can be used for extending a local area network (LAN) or also for VPN purposes when paired with the likes of IPsec for providing encryption. L2TP also has a variety of other use-cases with this bare protocol able to offer a layer two link over an L3 network.

  • libinput 1.12.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    Only two notable features in this release but patches are accumulating on
    master, it's been 6 months since 1.12 and I've decided to postpone the two
    major features (hi-res scrolling and totem support) to 1.14.
    
    
    
    
    Touch arbitration has improved for tablets, especially on touch screens.
    A timer set on pen proximity out means we don't get ghost touches anymore
    when the hand lifts off slower than the pen itself. And location-based touch
    arbitration means that parts of the screen can be interacted with even while
    the pen is in proximity. libinput uses the tilt information where
    available to disable touches in a rectangle around the pen where the hand is
    likely to be but leaves the rest of the touchscreen available otherwise.
    Where the UI supports it, this allows for bimanual interaction.
    
    
    
    
    The test suite is installed on demand (meson -Dinstall-tests=true). Where
    run from the installed location it will use the normal library lookups and
    the quirks directory as defined by the prefix. This makes it useful for
    distribution-level testing, i.e. run this on a test machine after updating
    the package to make sure everything is as expected. Where available, you can
    invoke it with the "libinput test-suite" command.
    
    
    
    
    Other than that, a load of fixes, quirks added, cleanups, tidy-ups and so on
    an so forth.
    
    
    
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below. Many thanks to all the contributors.
  • Libinput 1.13 Is Coming But High-Resolution Scrolling & Dell Totem Support Delayed

    Libinput is fairly mature at this stage for offering a unified input handling library for use on both X.Org and Wayland Linux desktops. Libinput has largely reached a feature plateau with new releases no longer coming out so often and no glaring gaps in support. With it already being a half-year since the last major release, libinput 1.13 is now being buttoned up for release and available today is the first release candidate. 

    Libinput 1.13 isn't that exciting of a release particularly since maintainer Peter Hutterer of Red Hat decided to delay the high resolution scrolling support. The Linux 5.0 kernel brought the much anticipated high resolution scrolling support for various Logitech/Microsoft mice to improve the scroll-wheel experience. Besides the kernel support, there is also the user-space support that needs updating. Peter decided to delay this functionality now until Libinput 1.14 to give it more time to bake.

  • New package in Fedora: python-xslxwriter
  • First Public Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0!

More in Tux Machines

New features in OpenStack Neutron

OpenStack is the open source cloud infrastructure software project that provides compute, storage, and networking services for bare-metal, container, and VM workloads. To get a sense of the core functionality and additional services, check out the OpenStack map. The platform has a modular architecture that works across industry segments because infrastructure operators can choose the components they need to manage their infrastructure in the way that best supports their application workloads. The modules are also pluggable to provide further flexibility and make sure they can be used with a specific storage backend or software-defined networking (SDN) controller. Neutron is an OpenStack project to provide a de-facto standard REST API to manage and configure networking services and make them available to other components such as Nova. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Full Circle Weekly News #125
  • Why Open19 Designs Matter for Edge Computing [Ed: Openwashing Microsoft without even any source code]
    On the opening day of this year's Data Center World in Phoenix, Yuval Bachar, LinkedIn's principal engineer of data center architecture, was on hand to explain why the social network's Open19 Project will be an important part of data centers' move to the edge.
  • Course Review: Applied Hardware Attacks: Rapid Prototying & Hardware Implants
    Everyone learns in different ways. While Joe is happy to provide as much help as a student needs, his general approach probably caters most to those who learn by doing. Lecture is light and most of the learning happens during the lab segments. He gives enough space that you will make mistakes and fail, but not so badly that you never accomplish your objective. If you read the lab manual carefully, you will find adequate hints to get you in the right direction. On the other hand, if you’re a student that wants to site in a classroom and listen to an instructor lecture for the entire time, you are definitely in the wrong place. If you do not work on the labs, you will get very, very, little out of the course. The rapid prototyping course is a good introduction to using the 3D printer and pcb mill for hardware purposes, and would be valuable even for those building hardware instead of breaking it. It really opened my eyes to the possibilities of these technologies. On the other hand, I suspect that the hardware implants course has limited application. It’s useful to learn what is possible, but unless you work in secure hardware design or offensive security that would use hardware implants, it’s probably not something directly applicable to your day to day.
  • Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar
    I’ve written a lot about multimedia software including a wide range of music players, some built with web-technologies, others using popular widget toolkits like Qt and GTK. I want to look at another music player today. You may not have heard of this one, as development stalled for a few years. But it’s still under development, and it offers some interesting features. It’s called Nulloy. The software is written in the C++ programming language, with the user interface using the Qt widget toolkit. It’s first release was back in 2011.
  • A Complete List of Google Drive Clients for Linux

Security Leftovers

SmartArt and Contributors to LibreOffice

  • SmartArt improvements in LibreOffice, part 4
    I recently dived into the SmartArt support of LibreOffice, which is the component responsible for displaying complex diagrams from PPTX. I focus on the case when only the document model and the layout constraints are given, not a pre-rendered result. First, thanks to our partner SUSE for working with Collabora to make this possible.
  • Things to know if you are a new contributor to LibreOffice code
    When I began contributing code to LibreOffice, I faced some issues because I didn't know several facts that the other active contributors knew. This blog post summarizes some of those facts, and I hope it will be useful for other new contributors!