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Events: Linux Plumbers Conference and Copyleft Conference

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OSS
  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 Call for Microconference Proposals

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Microconferences for the 2019 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Lisbon, Portugal on September 9-11 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 Call for Refereed-Track Proposals

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed-Track talk proposals for the 2019 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which will be held in Lisbon, Portugal on September 9-11 in conjunction with the Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit.

    Refereed track presentations are 50 minutes in length (which includes time for questions and discussion) and should focus on a specific aspect of the “plumbing” in the Linux system. Examples of Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, toolchains, container runtimes, core libraries, windowing systems, management tools, device support, media creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

  • Source-code access for the long haul

    Corporations that get their feet wet in the sea of free software often find out that not only do they now have obligations to provide source code, but that people will actually try to access it and complain loudly if they can't get it. At the first Copyleft Conference, Alexios Zavras from Intel spoke alongside Stefano Zacchiroli from Software Heritage about how the two organizations are working together. Software Heritage's mission makes it ideally suited to host Intel's many source-code releases in a way that provides stable long-term repositories that Intel can then reference.

    This year's FOSDEM was its 19th edition, and it's now a regular and much-loved part of the European free-software year. But for the first time, the Software Freedom Conservancy organized a one-day Copyleft Conference immediately following FOSDEM in Brussels; it is intended to allow a more in-depth exploration of copyleft issues than the Legal and Policy Issues devroom at FOSDEM can accommodate.

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