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Audio/Video: Archman 19.03 Openbox Run Through, Best Ubuntu Apps, Going Linux and Open Source Security Podcast

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  • Archman 19.03 Openbox Run Through

    In this video, we look at Archman 19.03 Openbox.

  • The Best Ubuntu Apps

    Best Ubuntu Apps. There are countless apps or applications for Ubuntu and other Linux distros available. However, I feel strongly that these five Linux apps are must have software, especially the first four software titles. The latter is simply an application I feel strongly that most of us who have large ebook libraries ought to be using.

  • Going Linux #364 · Back to Basics - Definition of Terms

    Today we define some basic terms used in the Linux and Open Source community. This is the first in a series of 'back to basics' episodes in which we will update the information we've been providing over the past 12 years. We also want to ensure that we continue to provide a reference for Linux users to use as a reference when using Linux for their day-to-day computing needs.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 137 - When the IoT attacks!

    Josh and Kurt talk about when devices attack! It's not quite that exciting, but there have been a slew of news about physical devices causing problems for humans. We end on the note that we're getting closer to a point when lawyers and regulators will start to pay attention. We're not there yet, so we still have a horrible insecure future on the horizon.

Archman 2020.03 "GNOME" overview

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Perl and More

  • 2020.14 More perspectives

    Andrew Shitov has even been more busy than the past weeks. Apart from adding more and more views to the Covid-19 Observer, so many that there’s now an impressive “What’s new” page. But Andrew didn’t stop at that: an article on Perl.com titled “Observing Coronavirus Pandemic with Raku” (/r/perl comments) explains to the readers how some of the unique features of Raku were applied in processing all of the data. And in the meantime Andrew still found time to publish Chapter 7 of their compiler book.

  • Dancer2 0.300001 Released

    On behalf of the Dancer Core Team, I’d like to announce the availability of Dancer2 0.300001. This maintenance release brings brings a revamped tutorial, fixing of a YAML-related regression, repair of an encoding bug, and a slew of documentation fixes.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 054: Kth Permutation Sequence + Collatz Conjecture
  • You Need To Stop Using HTML Email

    We need to change this norm from the ground up as a grass roots effort. We'll never convince Gmail and others to automatically display emails in plain text for all users. Nor will we convince companies to stop sending HTML emails to their clients. The only way is to start sending plain text emails and setting up our email programs to only display our received emails as plain text.

    As more and more people do this the companies will begin to follow suite due the increasing number of people being unable to easily read their messages.

    It's also our duty as good email users to only every send emails as plain text because we can not always be sure that the receiver of our emails is using a program that will render out all the HTML instead of displaying it as a webpage.

    Keep in mind that by plain text I don't mean you should not encrypt your emails. If you need to encrypt them then please do; PGP and GPG work very well. When sending an encrypted message; type up your message, encrypt it, and the paste the encrypted output into the email as plain text.

  • Safer SSH agent forwarding

    As mentioned, a better alternative is to use the jump host feature: the SSH connection to the target host is tunneled through the SSH connection to the jump host. See the manual page and this blog post for more details.

    If you really need to use SSH agent forwarding, you can secure it a bit through a dedicated agent with two main attributes:

    it holds only the private key to connect to the target host, and

    it asks confirmation for each requested signature.

  • LLVM's Flang/F18 Fortran Compiler Might Be Back On Track For Merging Soon

    Since the "f18" open-source Fortran compiler front-end was approved last year for merging as the newest LLVM sub-project and using the Flang name, there have been a number of false starts in getting the code merged. This year alone Flang had multiple delays and cancelled merge plans as the developers worked to get the code ready for upstream. Now though it looks like it could be ready to cross that long sought after milestone for having an in-tree Fortran front-end. Richard Barton announced today that the team now believes F18 is ready to be merged. There still are some open items still being worked on, but should be easily resolved after the F18 code is within the tree as the new "Flang" compiler.

  • A Telegram bot in Haskell on Amazon Lambda

    So instead adding layers and complexities, can I solve this instead my making things simpler? If I compiler my bootstrap into a static Linux binary, it should run on any Linux, including Amazon Linux. [...] I am mostly happy with this setup: My game is now available to more people in more ways. I don’t have to maintain any infrastructure. When nobody is using this bot no resources are wasted, and the costs of the service are neglectible -- this is unlikely to go beyond the free tier, and even if it would, the cost per generated image is roughly USD 0.000021. There is one slight disappointment, though. What I find most intersting about Kaleidogen from a technical point of view is that when you play it in the browser, the images are not generated by my code. Instead, my code creates a WebGL shader program on the fly, and that program generates the image on your graphics card.

  • Cambridge Computing Education Research Symposium – recap of our online event
  • Digital Making at Home: Storytelling with code

Linux 5.6 I/O Scheduler Benchmarks: None, Kyber, BFQ, MQ-Deadline

While some Linux distributions are still using MQ-Deadline or Kyber by default for NVMe SSD storage, using no I/O scheduler still tends to perform the best overall for this speedy storage medium. In curious about the current state of the I/O schedulers with the newly-minted Linux 5.6 kernel, here are benchmarks of no I/O scheduler against MQ-Deadline, Kyber, BFQ, and BFQ low-latency. This round of tests were done on the high performance Corsair Force MP600 1TB PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD while similar tests are still being conducted on SATA SSDs and HDDs off Linux 5.6. Read more

Server: CentOS, MitM, Ceph, Kubernetes and Linux Bashing

  • Learn CentOS Part 11 - Installing and removing Packages

    In the "Learn CentOS" series, you'll learn all the skills you'll need to know to manage real servers and get you on your way to mastering the art of Linux administration.

  • How to avoid man-in-the-middle cyber attacks

    Remember, you don't have to click anything online right away, and you don't have to follow random people's instructions, no matter how urgent they may seem. The internet will still be there after you step away from the computer and verify the identity of a person or site demanding your attention. While MITM attacks can happen to anyone, understanding what they are, knowing how they happen, and actively taking steps to prevent them can safeguard you from being a victim.

  • Another perspective on Swift versus Ceph today

    Mark's perspective is largely founded in the fault tolerance and administrative overhead. However, let's a look at "keep using [Ceph] for object too". Indeed the integration of block, POSIX, and object storage is Ceph's strength, although I should note for the record that Ceph has a large gap: all 3 APIs live in separate namespaces. So, do not expect to be able to copy a disk snapshot through CephFS or RGW. Objects in each namespace are completely invisible to two others, and the only uniform access layer is RADOS. This is why, for instance, RGW-over-NFS exists. That's right, not CephFS, but NFS. You can mount RGW. All attempts at this sort of integration that I know in Swift always start with a uniform access first. It the opposite of Ceph in a way. Because of that, these integrations typically access from the edge inside, like making a pool that a daemon fills/spills with Swift, and mounting that. SwiftStacks's ProxyFS is a little more native to Swift, but it starts off with a shared namespace too.

  • API Priority and Fairness Alpha

    This blog describes “API Priority And Fairness”, a new alpha feature in Kubernetes 1.18. API Priority And Fairness permits cluster administrators to divide the concurrency of the control plane into different weighted priority levels. Every request arriving at a kube-apiserver will be categorized into one of the priority levels and get its fair share of the control plane’s throughput.

  • BlackBerry: Chinese cybercriminals target high-value Linux servers with weak defenses [Ed: To CBS, servers that are improperly maintained or set up are "Linux"; if it's something Windows, they won't even specify the platform and won't blame Microsoft.]

GNU MediaGoblin: We’re still here!

Hello Goblin-Lovers! [tap tap] Is this thing still on? … Great! Well, we’ve had a few polite questions as to what’s happening in MediaGoblin-land, given our last blog post was a few years back. Let’s talk about that. While development on MediaGoblin has slowed over the last few years, work has continued steadily, with significant improvements such as multi-resolution video (Vijeth Aradhya), video subtitles (Saksham) and a bunch of minor improvements and bug-fixes. Like most community-driven free software projects, progress only happens when people show up and make it happen. See below for a list of the wonderful people who have contributed over the last few years. Thank you all very much! In recent years, Chris Lemmer Webber has stepped back from the role of much-loved project leader to focus on ActivityPub and the standardisation of federated social networking protocols. That process was a lot of work but ultimately successful with ActivityPub becoming a W3C recommendation in 2018 and going on to be adopted by a range of social networking platforms. Congratulations to Chris, Jessica and the other authors on the success of ActivityPub! In particular though, we would like to express our gratitude for Chris’s charismatic leadership, community organising and publicity work on MediaGoblin, not to mention the coding and artwork contributions. Thanks Chris! Read more