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Linux 5.0

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Linux

Ok, so the last week of the 5.0 release wasn't entirely quiet, but
it's a lot smaller than rc8 was, and on the whole I'm happy that I
delayed a week and did an rc8.

It turns out that the actual patch that I talked about in the rc8
release wasn't the worrisome bug I had thought: yes, we had an
uninitialized variable, but the reason we hadn't immediately noticed
it due to a warning was that the way gcc works, the compiler had
basically initialized it for us to the right value. So the same thing
that caused not the lack of warning, also effectively meant that the
fix was a no-op in practice.

But hey, we had other bug fixes come in that actually did matter, and
the uninitialized variable _could_ have been a problem with another
compiler.

Regardless - all is well that ends well. We have more than a handful
of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go "Hmm,
things are really unstable". In fact, at least two thirds of the
patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it's not
like 5.0 itself looks bad.

Knock wood.

Anyway, with this, the merge window for 5.1 is obviously open, and I'm
happy to see that I already have several early pull requests. Which
I'll start processing tomorrow.

And appended is - as usual - the shortlog just for the last week. The
overall changes for all of the 5.0 release are much bigger. But I'd
like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases,
and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers
started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.

Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.0 Kernel Released With Long-Awaited FreeSync Support, Many New/Improved Features

Linux Kernel 5.0 Officially Released, Here's What's New

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The development cycle of the Linux 5.0 kernel series kicked off two months ago, during which seven RC (Release Candidate) milestones were published for testing paving the road for this major version change, which, sadly, doesn't mean anything besides the fact that running Linux 5.x is cooler than running Linux 4.x.

    "The overall changes for all of the 5.0 release are much bigger. But I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement.

"But It Doesn’t Mean Anything"

Linux Kernel 5.0 Released!

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released! Check Out The New Features

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.0.

    Don’t get too excited thinking it’s a major new release because it’s called 5.0 instead of 4.22.

    It’s just that the major bump in the version number gives the impression that there might be a huge number of major new changes but that’s not the case here.

Plenty more coverage today and installation/upgrade guidance

  • Linux kernel 5.0 released and here is how to install it

    Linus Torvalds the creator and the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux kernel version 5.0. This release increases the major kernel version number to 5. from 4.x. The new change does not mean anything and does not affect programs in any way.

  • Linux kernel 5.0

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.0 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, How to Install it in Ubuntu

    The mainline kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Is Officially Out, ReactOS 0.4.11 Released, Python 2.7.16 Now Available, Some Linux Mint Updates and Rancher Labs Launches K3s

    Linux kernel 5.0 is out. Linus writes, "We have more than a handful of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go "Hmm, things are really unstable". In fact, at least two thirds of the patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it's not like 5.0 itself looks bad." The merge window for 5.1 is now open.

  • Linux 5.0 Released

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 5.0 in kicking off the kernel's 28th year of development. Linux 5.0 features include AMD FreeSync support, open-source NVIDIA Turing GPU support, Intel Icelake graphics, Intel VT-d scalable mode, NXP PowerPC processors are now mitigated for Spectre Variant Two, and countless other additions.

  • Linux 5.0 Introduces New Security Capabilities

    Linux 5.0, the first major milestone release of the open-source Linux kernel in 2019, launched on March 3.

    Linux 5.0 is the first version of the kernel since April 2015, when Linux 4.0 was released, with a major new version number. That said, Linux creator Linus Torvalds really doesn't assign a specific significance to new major version numbers, but rather the incremental number adjustment is somewhat arbitrary.

    "The numbering change is not indicative of anything special," Torvalds wrote in Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) message. "If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0."

LWN's Belated Coverage

  • The 5.0 kernel has been released.

    Headline features from this release include the energy-aware scheduling patch set, a bunch of year-2038 work that comes close to completing the core-kernel transition, zero-copy networking for UDP traffic, the Adiantum encryption algorithm, the seccomp trap to user space mechanism, and, of course, lots of new drivers and fixes. See the KernelNewbies 5.0 page for lots of details.

Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, This is What’s New

    Previously earmarked to be version 4.21, the new release comes with a bucket full of improvements (as you’d expect).

    But don’t expect grand changes just because there’s a natty new version number.

    Linus Torvalds explains that: “The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it’s that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0”.

    Hey Linus: if you ever need more fingers to count on, there are plenty of people willing to lend a hand …oh my god what a terrible joke why am I still typing it.

CRN

  • Linux 5.0 debuts – which means absolutely nothing

    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has released version 5.0 of the Linux kernel.

    In his announcement of the release, Torvalds wrote “I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that ‘5.0’ doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.” And once Torvalds gets post-digital, in terms of being able to keep track of release numbers, he rolls over from version .20 to .0.

More on Linux 5.0

  • SD Times news digest: Linux 5.0; Automation Anywhere’s free community edition, and Google’s .dev TLD now available

    Linux 5.0 has been released. According to an email sent by Linus Torvalds, there were a few issues at launch, but bug fixes are being worked on. “Regardless – all is well that ends well. We have more than a handful of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go “Hmm, things are really unstable”. In fact, at least two thirds of the patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it’s not like 5.0 itself looks bad,” he wrote.

    According to Torvalds, the 5.0 release isn’t that much bigger than previous releases, but that the 4.x releases were getting big enough in number that it was time for 5.x releases to start. He also noted that the merge window for 5.1 is already open and he has already received several pull requests.

"it’s not as big a deal as it sounds"

  • Linux 5.0 released (it’s not as big a deal as it sounds)

    Billions of devices run software that relies on the Linux kernel, including Android smartphones and tablets, Internet of Things devices, and servers and even some desktop and laptop computers (the things you probably think of first when you think of Linux).

    Linux founder Linus Torvalds released the first version of the Linux Kernel in 1991. Since then it’s grown into a massive free and open source project that powers much of the world’s technology.

    Today Torvalds announced the release of Linux 5.0 — and to be honest, it’s nothing special… or at least no more special than any other kernel update. While there are a number of bug fixes and new features, Torvalds notes that “we don’t do feature-based releases, and that “5.0” doesn’t mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.”

Google Code

  • Linux 5.0 “Shy Crocodile” Arrives With Google’s Adiantum Encryption

    Linus Torvalds just released version 5.0 of the Linux kernel, codenamed “Shy Crocodile”. Linux 5.0 includes Google’s new encryption tech as well as support for AMD FreeSync, Raspberry Pi touch screens, and more goodies.

    Linux 5.0 arrived on March 3, 2019. As Linus explained back in January on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML,) this isn’t really a huge release:

Linux 5 is now out

  • Linux 5 is now out

    Nothing special Torvalds just ran out of fingers and toes

    Linux 5.0, the first major milestone release of the open-source Linux kernel in 2019, has been launched.

    Linux 5.0 is the first version of the kernel since April 2015, when Linux 4.0 was released, with a significant latest version number.

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds doesn’t appear to be particularly excited and does not see a specific significance in reaching the big 5.0.

    IT’s “Mr Sweary” said the numbering change was not indicative of anything special.

Linux 5.0: A major milestone with minor improvements

  • Linux 5.0: A major milestone with minor improvements

    In an earlier Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) message, Torvalds had written "About 50 percent [of Linux 5.0] is drivers, 20 percent is architecture updates, 10 percent is tooling, and the remaining 20 percent is all over (documentation, networking, filesystems, header file updates, core kernel code..). Nothing particular stands out, although I do like seeing how some ancient drivers are getting put out to pasture (*cough*isdn*cough*)."

    That said, it does contain some worthwhile improvements.

    The new Linux comes with Google's Adiantum storage encryption system. Adiantum works on low-powered devices such as Android smartphones. It's a big step forward in securing these devices. It's faster than previous encryption systems. Paul Crowley and Eric Biggers, of Google's Android Security & Privacy Team, blogged, "Storage encryption protects your data if your phone falls into someone else's hands Adiantum is an innovation in cryptography designed to make storage encryption more efficient for devices without cryptographic acceleration, to ensure that all devices can be encrypted."

Linux 5.0 is out except it's really 4.21

  • Linux 5.0 is out except it's really 4.21 because Linus 'ran out of fingers and toes' to count on

    Linus Torvalds has squeezed out version 5.0 of the Linux kernel and flung open the merge window for its follow-up, 5.1.

    In the post announcing the arrival, Torvalds was at pains to point out that feature-based releases really aren't a thing and the 5.0 "doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes".

    However, there is actually much to delight Linux lovers in the release, which had been known as "4.21" before Torvalds' fingers and toes moment.

By Swapnil Bhartiya

  • Linux 5.0 Is Here

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux kernel has announced the release of Linux 5.0. Despite any excitement around the major release number, the fact is these numbers really don’t mean much. Torvalds has often said that he chooses a new number when the version number becomes too long. He simply doesn’t want “the numbers are big enough that you can't really distinguish them.”

    Announcing 5.0, Torvalds wrote, “I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.”

    That said there are many new features in this release, including support for GPUs. Linux 5.0 comes with improvement for AMD FreeSync, NVIDIA RTX Turing, and Raspberry Pi Touch Display support. It also comes with Google's Adiantum storage encryption system.

Linux 5.0 is not a big deal, claims Kernel Kitten

  • Linux 5.0 is not a big deal, claims Kernel Kitten

    As you may be aware, I, Colonel Kitten took a leave of absence last year, in order to learn how to be more empathetic and calm. Unfortunately, due to an admin error, I was accidentally enrolled in a macrame class. I am still fuming, but I make a really nice wicker basket.

    SO STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND LISTEN!

    Commander Torvalds has sent a memo. I have memorised the contents. Private Jones…. eat the memo.

    Linux 5.0 has been released for manoeuvres. I realise that this is normally rewarded with a day of mess leave, but the Commander has said clearly that it's not significant:

    "I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that '5.0' doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes."

One last

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released | Download Now

    Latest version of the Linux Kernel is out now. Yes, You heard it right. Linux Kernl 5.0 has been released. Linux Torvalds announces the release of latest version of Linux Kernel.

Took Linux Foundation One Week to Cover Linux 5.0

  • New Linux Kernel: The Big 5.0

    Linus Torvalds at last made the jump with the recent release of kernel 5.0. Although Linus likes to say that his only reason to move on to the next integer is when he runs out of fingers and toes with which to count the fractional part of the version number, the truth is this kernel is pretty loaded with new features.

    On the network front, apart from improvements to drivers like that of the Realtek R8169, 5.0 will come with better network performance. Network performance has been down for the last year or so because of Spectre V2. The bug forced kernel developers to introduce something called a Retpoline (short for "RETurn tramPOLINE") to mitigate its effect. The changes introduced in kernel 5.0 "[...] Overall [give a greater than] 10% performance improvement for UDP GRO benchmark and smaller but measurable [improvements] for TCP syn flood" according to developer Paolo Abeni.

    What hasn't made the cut yet is the much anticipated integration of WireGuard. Wireguard is a VPN protocol that is allegedly faster, more versatile and safer than the ones currently supported by the kernel. Wireguard is easy to implement, uses state of the art encryption, and is capable of maintaining the network link to the VPN up even if the user switches to a different WiFi network or changes from WiFi to a wired connection.

Weeks late

  • NEWS

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, has announced the release of Linux 5.0. Despite any excitement around the major release number, the fact is these numbers really don't mean much. Torvalds has often said that he chooses a new number when the version number becomes too long. He simply doesn't want a situation where "the numbers are big enough that you can't really distinguish them."

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