Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What's New in Symphony OS 2006-12

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The Symphony OS project released a new version of their unique system on December 13 to the surprise and delight of many in the Linux community. Many feared the revolutionary new desktop might be doomed due to a lack of funding, but developers chugged along through hard times and presented us with the culmination of months and months of work. Their labors show through in this release. As we're fans, Tuxmachines took Symphony OS 2006-12 for a bit of a test drive. So what's new this time?

For those new to Symphony OS, their site describes Symphony OS as follows:

SymphonyOS is a whole new type of Operating System, based on an advanced GNU/Linux base system Symphony provides Linux's renowned stability and immunity to Windows viruses along with what we consider to be the easiest to use interface out there, our Mezzo Desktop Environment. Installing applications is also a snap with our OneClick software store (we call it a store.. but everything there is free). You can see the latest news weather and other important information at a glance on your desktop with our desklet system and breathe new life into old hardware as all of this is designed to work on much lower end hardware than KDE or Gnome.


        

However, that's a bit outdated as One Click has now been replaced by Synaptic and is listed on the Programs page under Tasks as "Install Software." Synaptics is a wonderful program for installing software, usually. I didn't have a lot of luck with it under Symphony today. Errors varied, but I wasn't able to complete an install of anything. Perhaps it had to do with running off the livecd.

The Settings menu brings a lot of new abilities to Symphony OS this release. Previously, we only had Desktop Manager and Configure Login Screen listed, but this release we have several more. Other than those mentioned, also listed are:

  • Network Connection
  • Manage Users
  • Manage Disk Drives
  • Manage Services
  • Time & Date
  • Manage Share Folders

During my limited testing, these modules performed well and completed their intended function, except Manage Sharing Folders. This applet gave the error of needing Samba or NFS installed. Some of these apps were fairly complete while others were a bit minimalistic, but all add to the user experience and show the system is beginning to grow toward a viable desktop option.

VLC has been renamed to "Media Player" in its menu this go 'round, but unlike last time, it didn't function very well. In fact, it wouldn't open. Trying from the commandline found errors about modules and skins missing.


        

All in all we were quite pleased with the progress despite a few glitches here and there. This is still considered alpha code, so bugs are not only tolerated but expected. I love the new wallpaper and was glad to see all the new functions in the menu. Firefox has been updated to 2.0 and Synaptic is a wonderful choice in software managers. I didn't fully test the harddrive installer, but few posts seen on their site mention problems with dual boot setups and sata drives. If you've never booted Symphony OS, then you really should see it for yourself. It's definitely different from all the others. If you're a fan and haven't tested it as of yet, then again, you should probably see the new features. As always, we anxiously look forward to their next release.

Related Links:



It uses UnionFS

This CD's built on Slax's framework, and uses UnionFS to overlay the read-only filesystem in memory (like Knoppix does since v3.8, and other live CDs). (The UnionFS overlay can also be done from a loopback image saved on a hard drive or USB key.) So the filesystem acts as if it's completely read-write.

The problem with Synaptic seems to be related to a buggy package management system. The same error occurs using apt-get from the command line.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland
    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration. This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.
  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support
    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context. Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.
  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode
    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements. First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.
  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018
    - The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop. This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.
  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19
    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation To Be Renamed Fedora Silverblue
    - Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue. Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".
  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot
    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More
    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".
  • Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More
    Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.
  • A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts
    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time
    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report. Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing. The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”
  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer
    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer. HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.

HHVM 3.27 Released