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Book Review: Ubuntu Linux For Non-Geeks

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Linux, any flavor of it, has always been a tough nut to crack for home users. Though, originally a "console" based operating system, Linux evolved into a GUI (Graphical User Interface) based system. This eased off things a bit, but in the end, the home user base has always been wary of it.

That was until Ubuntu came.

Ubuntu unleashed a new wave, nothing less. Right from the installation, Ubuntu kept its promise of simplicity, throughout all its versions. The smooth installation, ease of use and simplicity have been just some of the traits of this beautiful, "Free", Operating System.

Now, an OS like Ubuntu, needs a guidebook like Ubuntu. "Ubuntu Linux For Non-Geeks" by Rickford Grant, is just what the doctor ordered. A Pain-Free, Project-Based, Get-Things-Done Guidebook.

It starts off with the "Ifs & Buts", and goes on to the "Whats & Whens". It's aimed at relieving the first time user's initial nervousness.

Full Story.

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