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Programming: Tryton Unconference, Argonne Looks to Singularity for HPC Code Portability, Mitogen v0.2.4 and More Python Bits

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  • Tryton Unconference 2019: In Marseille on the 6th & 7th of June

    We will go in the sunny city of Marseille in south of France on the 6th and 7th of June. Contrary to previous editions of the Tryton Unconferences the coding sprint will be organized during the two days preceding the conference.

  • Argonne Looks to Singularity for HPC Code Portability

    Scaling code for massively parallel architectures is a common challenge the scientific community faces. When moving from a system used for development—a personal laptop, for instance, or even a university’s computing cluster—to a large-scale supercomputer like those housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers traditionally would only migrate the target application: the underlying software stack would be left behind.

    To help alleviate this problem, the ALCF has deployed the service Singularity. Singularity, an open-source framework originally developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and now supported by Sylabs Inc., is a tool for creating and running containers (platforms designed to package code and its dependencies so as to facilitate fast and reliable switching between computing environments)—albeit one intended specifically for scientific workflows and high-performance computing resources.

  • Mitogen v0.2.4 released

    Mitogen for Ansible v0.2.4 has been released. This version is noteworthy as it contains major refinements to the core libary and Ansible extension to improve its behaviour during larger Ansible runs.

    Work on scalability is far from complete, as it progresses towards inclusion of a patch held back since last summer to introduce per-CPU multiplexers. The current idea is to exhaust profiling gains from a single process before landing it, as all single-CPU gains continue to apply in that case, and there is much less risk of inefficiency being hidden in noise created by multiple multiplexer processes.

  • Introducing kids to computational thinking with Python
  • The Factory Method Pattern and Its Implementation in Python
  • PyDev of the Week: Paolo Melchiorre
  • Create a filter for the audio and image files with python
  • Some simple CodeWars problems

More in Tux Machines

Games: ct.js, Sin Slayers, Path of Titans, Steam and More

  • 2D game editor ct.js goes open source and it's closing in on a new major release

    With an aim to make 2D game development learning fun, ct.js recently went open source to allow anyone to jump in and try it as well as help push it further. It's going through a major revamp too, with the first few preview builds available. Since we're covering it, of course this means the editor has Linux support too! As the name of the game engine might suggest, games in ct.js are written in JavaScript.

  • A look over Steam's top releases from July, plus some usual quick thoughts on Linux support

    Valve continue their blog posts highlighting games doing well on the platform, with a look at their top releases on Steam during July now available. Just look with June and May, here's my own little run-down on it. As usual, Valve are looking at revenue earned during the first two weeks following the release of a game.

  • Dark fantasy RPG Sin Slayers is getting ready to release soon with Linux support

    Sin Slayers, an RPG with roguelike elements set in a dark fantasy world is getting ready to release with Linux support on September 5th.

  • Dino survival game Path of Titans has been fully funded ready to support Linux

    Path of Titans from Alderon Games has managed to pass the crowdfunding test, with their dino survival game hitting well over their initial goal. They had a flexible goal, meaning all funds raised would be sent to them even if the final target wasn't met. Not that it was needed, as they managed to raise $63,920 against the original $24,437 goal.

  • In SKUL, you're a special skeleton that switches heads to gain powers

    SouthPAWGames recently released a demo of their upcoming action-platformer SKUL, it's rather impressive with a pretty unusual cast of characters. You play as Skul, a skeleton guard with the power to switch heads with another and gain their power. From what the developer said, eventually you will regain some memories of your past life and eventually face your original death and find out the truth.

  • Rise of Industry is getting a futuristic expansion with 2130 releasing this year

    Dapper Penguin Studios recently announced Rise of Industry: 2130, a futuristic expansion to their sweet strategic tycoon game. 2130 seems to be taking Rise of Industry in an interesting direction, as it follows players overpulluting the world, creating a nuclear winter killing almost all life on the planet. Since they're not being constrained by history with the original set in 1930, they said for the expansion they're going "crazy with technobabble and future-tech".

  • Steam Play arrived on Linux one year ago, some thoughts

    Tomorrow marks a special occasion, as Steam Play celebrates its first birthday! A good time to reflect on how it’s impacted Linux gaming. Steam Play is a feature of the Steam client on Linux that enables you to play Windows games just like you would with any other Linux game. It’s a feature that was long requested by users, with multiple tickets being opened on Valve’s steam-for-linux bug tracker, like this one, all the way back in 2012. Announced officially on this day back in 2018, Valve shook the very core of Linux gaming and they’ve certainly made things interesting. What they came up in partnership with the team at CodeWeavers is called Proton—the name given to the software behind Steam Play. It takes Wine with some extra patches and bundles it together with other projects like DXVK. Proton is open source too, available to see on GitHub. Linux users have used Wine for many years to run all sorts of games and applications from Windows on Linux. An issue with Wine usage is that developers see you as another Windows user in their statistics. Steam Play does help to solve that issue, as your purchases do count and show up as a Linux sale on Steam.

  • The Iron Oath looks like a great turn-based tactical RPG coming to Linux next year

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign back in 2017, The Iron Oath is progressing well onto a release scheduled for next year. This is one covered here on GOL back in August of 2017 when the Kickstarter was running. We never did check back on how The Iron Oath did, so it's pleasing to see Curious Panda Games slashed through the $45,000 goal ending with $94,524! Did you miss it?

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Chris and Wes React to LINUX Unplugged | Jupiter Extras 3

    Nothing is worse than your past self. So we play old clips of LINUX Unplugged and react.

  • Linux Mint 19.2 "Xfce" overview | Light, simple, efficient

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 19.2 "Xfce" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • embedded computing mission-critical Linux

    Aitech Defense Systems, Inc. in Chatsworth, Calif., has ported the open-source Linux operating system... [...] With the combination of the SDK and the SFF's modular expansion design, the Ai-RIO enables users to create custom embedded systems that offer high performance, design flexibility and low-cost development. The embedded computing system is available in both ruggedized military or space-qualified versions.

  • Embedded in San Diego

    Starting tomorrow, Collabora will be exhibiting & speaking at Embedded Linux Conference North America (ELCNA) in San Diego, California. Co-located with the Open Source Summit North America, ELCNA is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using embedded Linux. If you are planning on attending either conference, make sure to stop by our booth to see what our team has been working on! This year, we'll be showcasing how Panfrost, the open source driver for Arm Mali GPUs, turns a RK3399 SoC (in this case, the versatile ROCK Pi 4), into a very attractive platform to try out Wayland on ARM devices.

  • Amazon DocumentDB Speeds Up With Slow Queries Logging

    Amazon continues to add extra supports to its non-relational database store DocumentDB with the addition of slow queries logging. Slow queries logging allows user to monitor their slowest queries in the cluster. This helps to improve overall performance of the cluster and the individual query. Once the user has enabled a set profiler for the query the system will monitor operations and if any queries run longer than the customer-defined threshold, set at 100ms by default, the system will log their execution time and send an alert to the CloudWatch Logs.

today's howtos