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Software: Latest From KDE and Proprietary Lightworks

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Software
  • Ring in the new

    It’s the second week of 2019 already, which means I’m curious what Nate is going to do with his series This week in usability .. reset the numbering from week 1? That series is a great read, to keep up with all the little things that change in KDE source each week — aside from the release notes.

    For the big ticket items of KDE on FreeBSD, you should read this blog instead.

  • Okular: PDF Signature + Certificate support has landed

    Signature handling is a big step for us, but it's also very complex, so i expect it to have bugs and things that can be improved so testers more than welcome.

    Compiling is a bit "hard" since it requires poppler 0.73 that was released a few days ago.

  • Lightworks Video Editor Shares Its Plans for 2019

    The Lightworks video editor is one of a number of professional-leaning media tools now available for Linux, and over the next year it’s going to get even better.

    That’s according to EditShare, the company behind the free (but not open-source) app. They’ve shared details on their plans for 2019, including a tease of a brand new version.

    First up, Lightworks 14.6. This is expected to enter public beta in the next few weeks. It will be final major release in the 14.x cycle.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Canonical Says Ubuntu 14.04 Extended Security Maintenance Begins April 25, 2019

Released five years ago on April 17th, 2014, the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series will reach its end of life next month on April 30th. Following on the success of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series, Canonical announced some time ago that it would offer its Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) commercial package to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS users as well. Canonical said it would reveal more details about when the ESM (Extended Security Maintenance) offering is available for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), so the company now announced that users who want to continue using the operating system and still receive security updates after the April 30th end of life, can purchase the ESM package beginning April 25th, 2019. Read more

Geary 3.32 Released with New App Icon, GNOME 3.32 Support

A major new version of the Geary e-mail client is now available for Linux users to download. Now, you’ll forgiven for feeling a sense of deja vu upon reading that as it’s only been a couple of weeks since the release of Geary 0.13 (itself the first update to the email app this year). But there’s a reason why a new release has appeared so soon after the last… Read more

Forbes Says The Raspberry Pi Is Big Business

Not that it’s something the average Hackaday reader is unaware of, but the Raspberry Pi is a rather popular device. While we don’t have hard numbers to back it up (extra credit for anyone who wishes to crunch the numbers), it certainly seems a day doesn’t go by that there isn’t a Raspberry Pi story on the front page. But given that a small, cheap, relatively powerful, Linux computer was something the hacking community had dreamed of for years, it’s hardly surprising. [...] So where has the Pi been seen punching a clock? At Sony, for a start. The consumer electronics giant has been installing Pis in several of their factories to monitor various pieces of equipment. They record everything from temperature to vibration and send that to a centralized server using an in-house developed protocol. Some of the Pis are even equipped with cameras which feed into computer vision systems to keep an eye out for anything unusual. [Parmy] also describes how the Raspberry Pi is being used in Africa to monitor the level of trash inside of garbage bins and automatically dispatch a truck to come pick it up for collection. In Europe, they’re being used to monitor the health of fueling stations for hydrogen powered vehicles. All over the world, businesses are realizing they can build their own monitoring systems for as little as 1/10th the cost of turn-key systems; with managers occasionally paying for the diminutive Linux computers out of their own pocket. Read more