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Entroware's New Linux Workstation Rocks Ryzen Threadripper And 4x Nvidia RTX GPUs

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The Entroware Hades also has the distinction of being the company's first AMD system, and includes 5 different Ryzen Threadripper options for those who don't want any compromises when it comes to ripping threads: Ryzen TR 1900X (8 cores, 16 threads) all the way up to the Ryzen TR 2990WX (32 cores, 64 threads).

I don't immediately see any weaknesses here, beyond the sticker shock when scaling up the hardware loadouts. The Hades begins with the Fractal Design FD-CA-DEF-R6C-BK case. Connectivity on the front ports is ample, with 2x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0 and 1 USB 3.0 Type-C port, as well as standard headphone and mic inputs. Moving to the back, you've got a total of eight USB SuperSpeed 3.1 ports (plus two additional ones at 10Gbps), 5x audio jacks, dual Gigabit Ethernet ports and a dual-antenna Intel Wireless-AC connection.

The minimum Hades loadout is perhaps too anemic for a workstation with this much capability, and it's admittedly a system you could assemble yourself for less. For the baseline price tag of about 1770 Euros (including tax) you'll get a 3-year warranty, a Ryzen Threadripper 1900X, 16GB of DDR4 RAM at 2933MHz, a 120GB SSD, a GeForce GT 1030 and Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE 18.04/18.10.

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