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Dell Shipped Linux On 162 Unique Platforms In Fiscal Year 2019

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Linux

Despite having shipped Linux on client systems since 1999, Dell has made waves in the developer and consumer space more recently with Project Sputnik, a now 6-year-old initiative that aimed to create a premium Linux PC that "just works" right out of the box using Ubuntu. That device, as most of you probably know, is the XPS 13.

However, over FY2019 Dell shipped Linux across 162 platforms, including various models of Precision Workstations, Latitude, Optiplex, Inspiron, Vostro and XPS lines. While Dell primarily ships with Ubuntu pre-installed, they also support a couple different China-specific distributions, and they certify machines like its Precision Mobile Workstation for Red Hat. (Dell simply chooses not to pre-install RHEL only because most customers will buy an enterprise license and then install it independently.)

If this hits you as somewhat of a surprise, you're not alone! Even Project Sputnik lead Barton George was taken aback by this statistic, and understands that people following Dell's movements don't necessarily have visibility into what's happening beyond Sputnik.

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