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Fedora, Red Hat and IBM Updates

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Red Hat
  • Laura Abbott: Kernel numbering and Fedora

    By now it's made the news that the kernel version has jumped to version 5.0. Once again, this numbering jump means nothing except Linus decide that he wanted to change it. We've been through versioning jumps before (2.6 -> 3.x, 3.x -> 4.x) so practically we know how to deal with this by now. It still takes a bit of hacking on the kernel packaging side though.

    Fedora works off of a package git (pkg-git) model. This means that the primary trees are not git trees of the actual source code but git trees of a spec file, patches, and any other scripts. The sources get uploaded in compressed archive format. For a stable fedora release (F28/F29 as of this writing), the sources are a base tarball (linux-4.19.tar.xz) and a stable patch on top of that (patch-4.19.14.xz). Rawhide is built off of Linus' master branch. Using 4.20 as an example, start with the last base release (linux-4.19.tar.xz), apply an -rc patch on top (patch-4.20-rc6.xz) and then another patch containing the diff from the rc to master on that day (patch-4.20-rc6-git2.xz). We have scripts to take care of grabbing from kernel.org and generating snapshots automatically so kernel maintainers don't usually think too much about this.

  • Better loop mounts with NBD. Take your loop mounts to the next level with nbdkit

    I’ve been working at Red Hat for 12 years, on a whole variety of different things, all relating to free and open source software. Most recently I’ve been concentrating on virtualization and how we inspect and modify the disk images used by virtual machines. I’ve written a whole load of tools for this, such as guestfish, virt-builder and nbdkit.

    Before I started at Red Hat I was involved in three start-ups, respectively in: high-performance networking; schools & online communities; and online marketing.

  • Kernel 4.20 Test Day 2019-01-15
  • In science and in space: Red Hat leads the way for supercomputing

    The computation capabilities and scale of supercomputers have grown and are expected to continue growing. The next big trend we’re likely to see is exascale computing, where supercomputers will be able to perform at least one billion billion (quintillion) floating point operations per second. At the moment, teams in the United States, Europe, Japan and China are all racing to build and deliver exascale systems in the next 3-5 years. It is no coincidence that this new generation of systems is referred to as “intelligent” supercomputers, as they have nearly enough processing power to simulate a human brain in software.

    We recently attended SC18, the leading supercomputing conference, and have several takeaways on what the future looks like for high performance computing (HPC).

    Originally projected to arrive this year, based on Moore's law, exascale class systems are now expected to appear by 2021, largely based on innovative approaches in hardware design, system-level optimizations and workload-specific acceleration. Several years ago, HPC visionaries determined that we can no longer rely on commodity Central Processing Unit (CPU) technologies alone to achieve exascale computing and became vigorously involved in innovation around other parts of the system.

  • Report: Investor drops lawsuit over $34B IBM-Red Hat merger

    An investor in Raleigh-based Red Hat on Tuesday filed a lawsuit seeking to block a shareholder vote on the firm’s $34 billion merger with IBM.

    The investor identified as Charles Orgel had filed the suit in federal court in Delaware.

  • Open Outlook: Global Services

    As we enter the fourth quarter of our fiscal year, I would like to take some time to reflect on the trends we are learning from our customers in the Red Hat Global Services Organization and what the next year holds for us.

    Looking back at 2018, I am most proud of the success we have seen as our role in the business increased. Services played a more prominent part in sales conversations, as more complex deals demanding solution approaches, adoption roadmaps, and return on investment emerged. As a result, we have seen training and services revenue growth of more than 25 percent in fiscal year 2018.

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