Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

FreeBSD 12.0 vs. DragonFlyBSD 5.4 vs. TrueOS 18.12 vs. Linux On A Tyan EPYC Server

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month when running FreeBSD 12.0 benchmarks on a 2P EPYC server I wasn't able to run any side-by-side benchmarks with the new DragonFlyBSD 5.4 as this BSD was crashing during the boot process on that board. But fortunately on another AMD EPYC server available, the EPYC 1P TYAN Transport SX TN70A-B8026, DragonFlyBSD 5.4.1 runs fine. So for this first round of BSD benchmarking in 2019 are tests of FreeBSD 11.2, FreeBSD 12.0, DragonFlyBSD 5.4.1, the new TrueOS 18.12, and a few Linux distributions (CentOS 7, Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, and Clear Linux) on this EPYC 7601 server in a variety of workloads.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Compact Jetson TX2 computer has eight USB 3.0 ports

Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-8150AI” computer runs Linux on a Jetson TX2 module and features 2x HDMI ports and 8x USB 3.0 ports for hooking up cameras for on-site edge AI analytics. Like the quad-GbE Boxer-8120AI, the Boxer-8150AI uses an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and its CUDA-enabled AI libraries to analyze visual information from connected cameras. In this case, the cameras don’t run over Ethernet, but USB 3.0. Like the Boxer-8120AI and Aaeon’s stripped down Boxer-8110AI spinoff, this is a fanless, rugged, Linux-driven device with a compact form factor, in this case measuring 153 x 101 x 45mm. Read more

Android Leftovers

Android Low-Memory Killer--In or Out?

One of the jobs of the Linux kernel—and all operating system kernels—is to manage the resources available to the system. When those resources get used up, what should it do? If the resource is RAM, there's not much choice. It's not feasible to take over the behavior of any piece of user software, understand what that software does, and make it more memory-efficient. Instead, the kernel has very little choice but to try to identify the software that is most responsible for using up the system's RAM and kill that process. The official kernel does this with its OOM (out-of-memory) killer. But, Linux descendants like Android want a little more—they want to perform a similar form of garbage collection, but while the system is still fully responsive. They want a low-memory killer that doesn't wait until the last possible moment to terminate an app. The unspoken assumption is that phone apps are not so likely to run crucial systems like heart-lung machines or nuclear fusion reactors, so one running process (more or less) doesn't really matter on an Android machine. Read more

today's leftovers