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These former Red Hat employees just got $25 million to try to find a new business model for open source software

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  • These former Red Hat employees just got $25 million to try to find a new business model for open source software

    Back in the early 2000s, people would balk at the notion of using free, open source software to run a serious business — companies like Red Hat, which bet its business model on the concept, were seen as oddities. But times have changed: Open source software is key to most modern computing infrastructures. And over a decade later, IBM plans to acquire Red Hat for a colossal $34 billion.

    Now, a group of former Red Hat employees have co-founded Tidelift, a startup that wants to repeat the trick and pioneer a new business model for open source software. To that end, Tidelift announced on Monday $25 million in new funding from General Catalyst, Foundry Group, and former Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik.

  • Tidelift Raises $25M Series B Just Seven Months After Last Funding

    Tidelift, a startup focused on helping developers work with open source technology, announced today the close of a $25 million Series B round of funding just seven months after its last raise.

    The Boston company has now raised a total of $40 million since it was founded in 2017.

  • Tidelift’s “Netflix for Open-Source Software” Model Gets $25M Boost

    Tidelift, a startup trying to solve some of the open-source software industry’s problems around compensation and security, said it wrapped up a $25 million investment to gather more publicly maintained software projects under its umbrella.

    The Boston-based company, founded in 2017 by four Red Hat vets, said it is trying to recreate what Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) did with the Linux open-source computer operating system—but with as large a swath of the open-source realm as possible.

  • Open source monetization startup Tidelift raises $25m series
  • Open source startup Tidelift grabs $25 mln Series B
  • Former Red Hat CEO Backs Tidelift’s $25M Series B

    Open source software company Tidelift raised $25 million in a Series B funding round, which followed closely on the heels of its $15 million Series A just seven months ago. General Catalyst, Foundry Group, and former Red Hat Chairman and CEO Matthew Szulik co-led the Series B. All three investors also co-led the startup’s Series A.

    The Boston-based company provides support services for open source projects including JavaScript, Java, Python, Ruby, Apache Struts, and Mongoose by partnering with project maintainers.

    Its business model works like this: companies pay Tidelift a subscription, and in return they receive professional support for the open source projects they use from the developers who created and maintain these projects. This includes security updates, maintenance, and legal assurances.

    Tidelift, in turn, pays the developers to provide this support. And this cycle “makes open source work better for everyone,” wrote co-founder and CEO Donald Fischer in a blog about the Series B. “More than 35 million open source repositories now depend on packages that are included in the Tidelift Subscription.”

Open-source software support provider Tidelift raises $2\5M

  • Open-source software support provider Tidelift raises $25M

    Open-source software company Tidelift Inc. is heading into the new year with renewed momentum after snagging a $25 million round of funding.

    The Series B round announced today was led by the investment firms General Catalyst and Foundry Group, as well as former Red Hat Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Matthew Szulik. The three investors had all participated in Tidelift’s previous $15 million Series A round in May.

    Tidelift said it will use the new funds to grow what it says is a unique business model for open-source software. It enables its customers to rely on the core developers of the projects they use to provide professional support services.

  • Open-source software maker Tidelift raises $25M funding round

Open Source Software Marketplace Tidelift Raises $25M

By Sean Michael Kerner

  • Tidelift Doubles Down On Supporting Open Source Enterprise Application Development

    As open source software continues to become increasingly important for enterprise application development, there is a need to help fund developer efforts.

    The basic premise of open source software is that the software is made available under an open permissive license, as defined by the Open Source Initiative's Open Source Definition.

    Open source software doesn't however necessarily mean software that is available for free, or without cost. That said, there is a lot of open source software is in fact freely available, where developers and maintainers have contributed time and effort and have not been compensated. Open source also isn't just about complete software suites, but also about components and libraries that often are widely used and deployed within commercial enterprise applications.

Tidelift: We Support the Long Tail of Open Source Projects

  • Tidelift: We Support the Long Tail of Open Source Projects

    The open source community has mature business models to support big projects like Linux, but what about everything else? Businesses depend on a plethora of open source projects supported by ad hoc teams of volunteer labor. These projects lack underlying business models to ensure ongoing support -- and get developers paid for their work.

    Tidelift is looking to solve that problem by contracting with private developers to maintain and secure open source projects, as well as sort through the confusing tangle of licensing to ensure that businesses are using open source correctly.

    Businesses, meanwhile, subscribe to open source packages supported by Tidelift.

Open Source Startup ‘Tidelift’ raises $25m in series B funding

  • Open Source Startup ‘Tidelift’ raises $25m in series B funding

    It’s always a great thing to know that more startups are now trying to tackle open source sustainability.

    Well, if you didn’t know already, Tidelift is a startup which aims to support the developers and maintainers by monetizing the open source software while also helping them to secure it and improve it.

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