Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software: Strawberry, GNU (GCC, GNUstep and Bash), The fish Shell and Kiwi TCMS

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • Strawberry – audio player and music collection organizer

    I’m a massive music fan with a large collection of CDs consisting mostly of classical, country, blues, and pop. Streaming services fills in for other music genres, so I basically dabble with a wide range of music. Linux is blessed with a mouthwatering array of excellent open source music players. But I’m always on the look out for fresh, eclectic, and innovative music players.

    Strawberry is an audio player and music collection organizer. It was originally forked from Clementine. The main goal was to create a player for playing local music files that looked a bit more like Amarok with advanced soundcard options. The music player is designed for music collectors, audio enthusiasts and audiophiles. The name is inspired by the band Strawbs.

    Strawberry saw its first release in April 2018, whereas Clementine hasn’t seen a formal release in a few years, but it’s still in development. I’ve been following the development of Strawberry with earnest, but until recently there was an important feature missing from this music player. That’s scrobbling. To “scrobble” a song means that when you listen to it, the name of the song is sent to a web site (such as Last.fm) and added to your music profile. Strawberry’s latest build offers support for Last.fm, Libre.fm, and Listenbrainz.

  • GCC 9 Status report (2019-01-07), trunk in regression and documentation fixes mode
  • GCC 9 Enters Its Final Stage Of Development, Releasing Around April

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced this morning that "stage three" development on GCC 9 is now over, which means all that's left before releasing it as GCC 9.1 is to carry out more regression and documentation fixes.

  • ANN: GNUstep GUI 0.27.0
  • GNUstep Starts 2019 With Improvements To This Open-Source Apple Cocoa Implementation

    GNUstep, the long-standing implementation of Apple's Cocoa/Objective-C frameworks as open-source and supported on Linux, BSDs, and other platforms, started off 2019 with some new releases. GNUstep GUI 0.27, GNUstep Base 1.26, and GNUstep GUI Backend 0.27 are the new releases out today.

    GNUstep 1.26.0 as the base library has improved UTF-8 checks, support for TLS SNI, improved XML parsing, better internationalization handling, improvements to stack trace handling, and various other low-level library improvements and bug fixes.

  • Bash-5.0 release available
  • Bash 5.0 Release Candidate Packing Many Changes & A Lot Of Fixes

    The release candidate of the upcoming GNU Bash 5.0 shell release is now available. Bash 5.0 is packing various fixes over Bash 4.4 but also a number of new features and improvements to better conform to POSIX specifications.

  • fish Shell Becomes More Awesome With 3.0 Release

    The fish Shell is “a smart and user-friendly command-line shell for Linux, macOS, and the rest of the family”. fish is a more modern shell with the goal of being more interactive and more user-friendly than older shells. Unlike its competitors, fish is not based on the Bourne shell or the C shell but attempts to blaze its own path.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.4

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.4! This is a security, improvement and bug-fix update that includes new versions of Django, Patternfly and other dependencies. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org!

GNU ed 1.15 released

  • GNU ed 1.15 released!

    Last week, GNU ed, a line-oriented text editor, released GNU ed 1.15. GNU ed is used to create, display, modify and otherwise manipulate text files, both interactively and via shell scripts.

    Red, a restricted version of ed, can only edit files in the current directory and cannot execute shell commands. Ed is the “standard” text editor and the original editor for Unix. For most purposes, however, it is superseded by full-screen editors such as GNU Emacs or GNU Moe.

More on Bash

Bash 5.0 released

Late coverage by Kay Ewbank

  • Bash 5 Adds New Shell Variables

    The fifth major version of Bash, the UNIX/Linux scripting shell has arrived. The new release has fixed a variety of bugs from the previous version, and has also added new features and improvements to better conform to POSIX specifications.

    Bash is the GNU Project's Bourne Again SHell, a complete implementation of the POSIX shell spec. It also comes with interactive command line editing, job control on architectures that support it, csh-like features such as history substitution and brace expansion.

And much belated coverage

  • Bash shell utility turns 5.0

    A few months prior to celebrating the 30th birthday of the Bash command language interpreter, the GNU Project has released Bash 5.0, featuring bug fixes and new shell variables.

    As we look forward to the release of Linux Kernel 5.0 in the coming weeks, we can enjoy another venerable open source technology reaching the 5.0 milestone: the Bash shell utility. The GNU Project has launched the public version 5.0 of GNU/Linux’s default command language interpreter. Bash 5.0 adds new shell variables and other features and also repairs several major bugs.

    New shell variables in Bash 5.0 include BASH_ARGV0, which “expands to $0 and sets $0 on assignment,” says the project. The EPOCHSECONDS variable expands to the time in seconds since the Unix epoch, and EPOCHREALTIME does the same, but with microsecond granularity.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt

  • LHS Episode #266: #$%&! Net Neutrality
    Welcome to the first episode of Linux in the Ham Shack for 2019. In this episode, the hosts discuss topics including the 2018 RTTY Roundup using FT-8, Cubesats and wideband receivers in space, the ORI at Hamcation, Wekcan, Raspberry Pi-based VPN servers, the LHS Linux distributions, CW trainers and much more.
  • LHS Episode #267: The Weekender XXII
    Welcome to the 22nd edition of the LHS Weekender. In this episode, the hosts discuss upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, Open Source events in the next fortnight, Linux distributions of interest, news about science, technology and related endeavors as well is dive into food, drink and other hedonistic topics.
  • Linux Action News 89
    Another troubling week for MongoDB, ZFS On Linux lands a kernel workaround, and 600 days of postmarketOS. Plus our thoughts on the new Project Trident release, and Mozilla ending the Test Pilot program.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 130 - Chat with Snyk co-founder Danny Grander
  • The ACME Era | TechSNAP 395
    We welcome Jim to the show, and he and Wes dive deep into all things Let’s Encrypt.

Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku. With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful. Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time. Read more

This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!
  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag
    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.
  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020
    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform. The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process. "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.