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Linux 5.0 RC1

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  • Linux 5.0-rc1

    So this was a fairly unusual merge window with the holidays, and as a
    result I'm not even going to complain about the pull requests that
    ended up coming in late. It all mostly worked out fine, I think. And
    lot of people got their pull requests in early, and hopefully had a
    calm holiday season. Thanks again to everybody.

    The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you
    want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and
    toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0. There's no nice git object
    numerology this time (we're _about_ 6.5M objects in the git repo), and
    there isn't any major particular feature that made for the release
    numbering either. Of course, depending on your particular interests,
    some people might well find a feature _they_ like so much that they
    think it can do as a reason for incrementing the major number.

    So go wild. Make up your own reason for why it's 5.0.

    Because as usual, there's a lot of changes in there. Not because this
    merge window was particularly big - but even our smaller merge windows
    aren't exactly small. It's a very solid and average merge window with
    just under 11k commits (or about 11.5k if you count merges).

    The stats look fairly normal. About 50% is drivers, 20% is
    architecture updates, 10% is tooling, and the remaining 20% is all
    over (documentation, networking, filesystems, header file updates,
    core kernel code..). Nothing particular stands out, although I do like
    seeing how some ancient drivers are getting put out to pasture
    (*cought*isdn*cough*).

    As usual even the shortlog is much too big to post, so the summary
    below is only a list of the pull requests I merged.

    Go test. Kick the tires. Be the first kid on your block running a 5.0
    pre-release kernel.

    Linus

  • Linux 5.0-rc1 Debuts With New Hardware Support, FreeSync, I3C, High-Res Scrolling

    Linus Torvalds ended the Linux 4.21 merge window on Sunday evening and decided to go ahead and rename it to Linux 5.0. Linux 5.0-rc1 is now available to begin the testing process for this next kernel release that will officially debut around the end of February or early March.

    A short time ago I posted our Linux 5.0 feature overview that covers the major highlights of this new kernel release. See that two-page article for all of the details but some of the highlights include: AMD FreeSync, Raspberry Pi Touchscreen driver, a new console font for HiDPI/retina displays, initial open-source NVIDIA RTX Turing support with Nouveau, Adiantum data encryption support, Logitech high resolution scrolling support, I3C subsystem, and a lot of other new hardware support. The decision to jump over to Linux 5.0 from Linux 4.21 was decided by Linus Torvalds with the 4.x kernel releases getting high, similar to the arbitrary move of re-branding Linux 3.20 to Linux 4.0.

Linux 5 is on the way

  • Linux 5 is on the way

    In his Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) post, Torvalds wrote, "The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0."

    Surely, there's more to it than that. Right? Nope.

    Torvalds went on, "Go wild. Make up your own reason for why it's 5.0."

"Linux 5.0-rc1 Released"

  • Linux 5.0-rc1 Released, Scratch 3 and Raspberry Pi, Phoronix Test Suite 8.6-Spydeberg Milestone 1 Is Now Available, Elteria Adventures Coming to Linux and Chromium Now Supports VAAPI in Fedora

    Linux 5.0-rc1 was released yesterday. Linus Torvalds wrote: "The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0. There's no nice git object numerology this time (we're _about_ 6.5M objects in the git repo), and there isn't any major particular feature that made for the release numbering either. Of course, depending on your particular interests, some people might well find a feature _they_ like so much that they think it can do as a reason for incrementing the major number. So go wild. Make up your own reason for why it's 5.0."

  • Linux Kernel 4.2

    A few weeks ago, in the final days leading up to Christmas, Linus Torvalds released version 4.20 of the Linux Kernel. Collaborans were once again active during this development cycle, contributing 22 patches, 112 reviews & 55 sign-offs. Below is a summary of their contributions. As is the custom, head to LWN.net if you would like to read more about the merge window for 4.20 (part 1 & part 2).

Linux reaches the big five (point) oh

  • Linux reaches the big five (point) oh

    Penguinistas, take heed. The kernel of your beloved OS has rung in the new year with a brand spanking new version number because... Linus felt like it.

    Linux fans will be relieved to know that while 2019 should feature a gentler, softer and less sweary Torvalds, the man's ability to make arbitrary decisions remains undiminished. The reason version 4.21 became 5.0 is because "I ran out of fingers and toes to count on."

Linus Torvalds Finally Kicks Off Development of Linux 5.0

  • Linus Torvalds Finally Kicks Off Development of Linux 5.0, Coming March 2019

    After a long wait, we will finally be able to run the long-anticipated Linux 5.0 kernel on our Linux-powered computers as Linus Torvalds kicked off 2019 with the development cycle of Linux kernel 5.0.

    While not a special release, like many of you out there would have expected from such major milestone, Linux kernel 5.0 is coming in a few months to the stable repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution with updated and new drivers, architecture and tooling updates, as well as various improvements to networking, filesystems, documentation, and core kernel code.

    "The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0. There's no nice git object numerology this time (we're _about_ 6.5M objects in the git repo), and there isn't any major particular feature that made for the release numbering either," said Linus Torvalds.

Linus Torvalds Welcomes 2019 with Linux 5.x

  • Linus Torvalds Welcomes 2019 with Linux 5.x

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux 5.0-rc1. The kernel was supposed to be 4.21, but he decided to move to the 5.x series. Torvalds has made it clear that the numbering of the kernel doesn’t make much sense. So don’t get too excited about this release.

    Torvalds explained in the LKML (Linux Kernel Mailing List), “The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and numerology this time (we're _about_ 6.5M objects in the git repo), and there isn't any major particular feature that made for the release numbering either,” he said.

By Chris Merriman 5 days late

  • Linux 5.0 lands with added Nvidia Turing RTX, AMD FreeSync support

    LINUX HAS been updated to a brand new version number, something that creates more excitement in users than in Linus Torvald's mind.

    Linux 5.0 has hit rc1, meaning that within weeks (roughly seven or eight), it will be the stable kernel for the various operating systems that depend on it.

    Despite the renumbering being as arbitrary as ever (he's been thinking of changing this for the last four versions) there are actually a whole bunch of new features to talk about.

    AMD FreeSync and Raspberry Pi touchscreen support have been added, there's early support for the Nvidia RTX Turing GPUs, and Logitech's high-resolution scrolling from its high-end mice.

Linux 5.0 Is Finally Arriving In March

  • Linux 5.0 Is Finally Arriving In March

    With last week’s release of Linux 5.0-rc1, it’s confirmed that Linus Torvalds has finally decided to adopt the 5.x series.

    The kernel enthusiasts and developers have been waiting for this change since the release of Linux 4.17. Back then, Linus Torvalds hinted at the possibility of the jump to place after 4.20 release.

Linux kernel 5.0 RC1 is available with ARM big.LITTLE

  • Linux kernel 5.0 RC1 is available with ARM big.LITTLE EAS support, F2FS fixes, and much more

    While we don’t typically cover what happens in the mainline Linux kernel realm, it’s important for us to keep track of what’s going on with each new kernel release since Google mandates a minimum Linux kernel version requirement with each new release of Android. The recent decision to extend LTS releases from 2 to 6 years will play a major role in reducing security patch fragmentation since device makers will have to do less work in backporting security patches. Plus, the mainline kernel does often integrate new features that are relevant to mobile devices.

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