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Red Hat Creates Fedora Foundation

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Linux

Red Hat Inc. has decided to hand over control of the open-source Fedora Project, creating the new Fedora Foundation to manage the project.

Mark Webbink, the deputy general counsel at Red Hat, of Raleigh, N.C., will make the announcement during a talk at the Red Hat Summit here early Friday morning.

Until now the Fedora Project, which Red Hat describes as an "openly-developed project designed by Red Hat, open for general participation, led by a meritocracy, following a set of project objectives," has been dominated by Red Hat staffers, with the technical lead and the steering committee all being Red Hat employees.

"The goal of The Fedora Project is to work with the Linux community to build a complete, general purpose operating system exclusively from open source software. Development will be done in a public forum ... By using this more open process, we hope to provide an operating system more in line with the ideals of free software and more appealing to the open source community," the Fedora Project Web site says.

But it appears that Fedora has not been all that appealing to developers, many of whom have questioned how Red Hat, as a commercial vendor of Linux software and support, could also control the project.

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