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And the battle rages on

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OS

I just finished reading Chris Dawson's article "Will your students be using Linux in 2007?" and, as usual, I agree with him 100% — until he says

"Businesses who have successfully made the switch to Linux often have a culture that caters to said enthusiasts and/or have dumped enough effort into training to get users up to speed."

His statement goes to the core of the problem with this debate — and the misunderstanding that surrounds the debate. Linux was invented to offer an alternative to UNIX — not Windows. It does everything UNIX does — INCLUDING running browsers and personal productivity suites.

Until Windows came along, there was no perceived need to run personal productivity applications on UNIX. Similarly, there was no perceived need to run a web browser on Windows until Universities started sharing information on the World-Wide-Web. Linux jumped on the open-source personal productivity bandwagon to keep abreast of UNIX, not Windows. And Linux has done an excellent job in that regard!

Full Post.

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