Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

And the battle rages on

Filed under
OS

I just finished reading Chris Dawson's article "Will your students be using Linux in 2007?" and, as usual, I agree with him 100% — until he says

"Businesses who have successfully made the switch to Linux often have a culture that caters to said enthusiasts and/or have dumped enough effort into training to get users up to speed."

His statement goes to the core of the problem with this debate — and the misunderstanding that surrounds the debate. Linux was invented to offer an alternative to UNIX — not Windows. It does everything UNIX does — INCLUDING running browsers and personal productivity suites.

Until Windows came along, there was no perceived need to run personal productivity applications on UNIX. Similarly, there was no perceived need to run a web browser on Windows until Universities started sharing information on the World-Wide-Web. Linux jumped on the open-source personal productivity bandwagon to keep abreast of UNIX, not Windows. And Linux has done an excellent job in that regard!

Full Post.

More in Tux Machines

Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more