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Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce, MATE and Cinnamon

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  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” MATE – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Cinnamon – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

By Brian Fagioli

  • Ubuntu-based Linux Mint 19.1 'Tessa' Beta now available with Cinnamon, MATE, or Xfce

    Windows 10 is getting worse every day. I used to call it a dumpster fire, but now I think it has devolved into an overturned "Porta-Potty" following all-day tailgating at an NFL stadium. Just recently, we learned that Microsoft is causing blue screens of death on its own Surface Book 2 hardware due to a bad update. Problematic updates are just par for the course for Windows 10 these days -- a crap (pun intended) shoot.

    If you are tired of living in constant fear that your computer will break due to a faulty Windows update, it is time to finally evolve and switch to a Linux-based operating system. There are countless great choices from which to choose, but for many, Linux Mint is computing nirvana. It is stable, fast, and looks great. Regardless of which desktop environment you choose -- Cinnamon, MATE, or Xfce -- you will be treated to a great user experience. Today, the upcoming Linux Mint 19.1 (named "Tessa") achieves Beta status.

Expect another Christmas release for Linux Mint

  • Linux Mint 19.1 betas released in anticipation for full release this month

    The Linux Mint project has finally released the beta builds of Linux Mint 19.1 in preparation forthe final release which is due by Christmas. The betas are available in three flavours, Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce. The team has already published many of the new improvements in previous blog posts but now they’ve also announced a new feature which will allow you to clean up old kernels which is handy as the boot sector was getting filled easily in Linux Mint 19.

    With Linux Mint 19, a change was made that will suggest users install the kernel updates along with other patches, which wasn’t the case before. Over time the new kernels would get installed and old kernels would stick around unless you went into the kernels manager in the Update Manager and removed them manually, one at a time. This caused users to get warnings that their boot sector was nearly full. Now, there is a "Remove old kernels" button in the kernel manager which will let you select old kernels that you want to remove and delete them. The new manager also lets you know the status of a kernel, for example, if it is unsupported, superseded, or supported, and how long for.

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