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Games: Sundered, Two Point Hospital, Dead Cells, Endhall, Grapple Force Rena

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Gaming
  • Sundered to get a big free update this month, sounds pretty good

    Sundered, the metroidvania action-platform with some fantastic art is going to expand soon and the update will be free.

  • Two Point Hospital: Bigfoot DLC now available with new weird ailments

    Two Point Hospital has expanded already with the first DLC already available and it does sound pretty good.

    Despite some shortcomings, Two Point Hospital is a great game for those who aren't looking for something serious. I enjoyed it a lot and certainly even more with a recent update adding in the extra sandbox mode.

    The new Bigfoot DLC was announced and released at the same time, adding in multiple new ailments to cure like Barking Mad, Mechanical Metropolism, Reptilian Metropolism, Bard Flu, Knightmares and Monster Mishmash. There's also entirely new hospitals for you to run and new decorative items, so there's plenty on offer.

  • Dead Cells, one of my favourite releases this year has a major testing build up

    Dead Cells, the incredibly stylish action-platformer with a sprinkle of metroidvania elements to make up what they call a Roguevania has a new major build out for testing.

  • Endhall, a small and challenging roguelike that's good for quick runs

    HeartBeast Studios L.L.C. just released their "byte sized roguelike" for those with little time on their hands.

  • Action platformer 'Grapple Force Rena' will have you swinging off everything

    Grapple Force Rena from developer GalaxyTrail is a sweet action platformer where your magic bracelets allow you to hook into any surface. That includes enemies too, as you hook into them and throw them out of your way.

    The gameplay and style is very reminiscent of early platformers we might have seen on something like the Sega Mega Drive (Genesis), it feels like a genuinely decent throwback.

More in Tux Machines

Build Your Own Internet Radio Receiver

When I get home at night, I like to tune into the world with the push of a button. I've lived in lots of different places—from Dunedin, New Zealand, to Santa Fe, New Mexico—and in each town, I've come to love a radio station (usually a community radio station) that embodies the spirit of the place. With the push of a button, I can get a bit back in sync with each of these places and also visit new communities, thanks to internet radio. Why build your own internet radio receiver? One option, of course, is simply to use an app for a receiver. However, I've found that the most common apps don't keep their focus on the task at hand, and are increasingly distracted by offering additional social-networking services. And besides, I want to listen now. I don't want to check into my computer or phone, log in yet again, and endure the stress of recalling YAPW (Yet Another PassWord). I've also found that the current offering of internet radio boxes falls short of my expectations. Like I said, I've lived in a lot of places—more than two or four or eight. I want a lot of buttons, so I can tune in to a radio station with just one gesture. Finally, I've noticed that streams are increasingly problematic if I don't go directly to the source. Often, streams chosen through a "middle man" start with an ad or blurb that is tacked on as a preamble. Or sometimes the "middle man" might tie me to a stream of lower audio quality than the best being served up. So, I turned to building my own internet radio receiver—one with lots of buttons that allow me to "tune in" without being too pushy. In this article, I share my experience. In principle, it should be easy—you just need a Linux distro, a ship to sail her on and an external key pad for a rudder. In practice, it's not too hard, but there are a few obstacles along the course that I hope to help you navigate. Read more

Want A Google-Free Android? Send Your Phone To This Guy

The recent US ban on Huawei may have reignited the debate over Android’s dominance and Google’s control over the smartphone market. The result of the ban is that Huawei had to come up with a new OS that doesn’t even have an inkling of Google’s proprietary software. For the rest of us, we have different third-party ROMs which try to remove Google from our phones in some way. Read more

Best Open Source Android Alternative OS for Smartphones

As most of the trade and technology-loving persons already heard about the US-China Trade War and Huawei-Google fight. Now, so many Huawei device users and Android enthusiasts are wondering what will be the next Android alternative OS (Operating System) for smartphones. Without Google and its services, the Android platform is difficult to run properly on a smartphone. But we also know that Huawei is a giant company and their research and development is so much effective. That means Huawei will survive with their own OS. But if you think about the different alternative operating systems that are running and available in the market. Here is the list of best Open Source Android Alternative OS for Smartphones which you can use easily. All the mentioned Android alternative operating system are open source based. These options are available to us. Read more

Events: Linux Plumbers, SUSE in Germany and LibreOffice Paris HackFest

  • Linux Plumbers Earlybird Registration Quota Reached, Regular Registration Opens 30 June
    A few days ago we added more capacity to the earlybird registration quota, but that too has now filled up, so your next opportunity to register for Plumbers will be Regular Registration on 30 June … or alternatively the call for presentations to the refereed track is still open and accepted talks will get a free pass.
  • Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference Frankfurt 2019
    In a week’s time, team SUSE will be heading to Frankfurt, Germany for this year’s Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference. Hundreds of attendees from all around Europe will be paying Kap Europa Congress Centre in Frankfurt a visit – to network, speak to exhibitors, pick up valuable nuggets of information from the Gartner analysts, attend sessions to learn more about the latest happenings in IT infrastructure and operations and enjoy all that the beautiful city of Frankfurt has to offer.
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