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Servers: SUSE, Red Hat, Docker and Kubernetes

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  • Transformation: It’s Not Just for Caterpillars!
  • Red Hat: Industry 4.0 use cases will drive 5G rollout

    Industrial use cases reveal that there is money to be made from 5G but telcos must adapt their business models if they are to capitalise on this opportunity

  • Decipher Technology Studios Announces Red Hat ISV Business Partnership
  • Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux 7.5 Earns FIPS 140-2 Certification Renewal; Paul Smith Quoted

    The company said Nov. 8 the FIPS 140-2 security certification renewal serves to validate Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other products such as Ceph Storage, CloudForms and OpenStack Platform for public sector deployments.

    “Regardless of technological advances, protecting sensitive information remains a top priority for every government entity, from executive agencies to state-level organizations,” said Paul Smith, senior vice president and general manager for Red Hat’s public sector business in North America.

  • Docker CEO Continues to Grow Container Business Opportunities
  • ​CNAB: Docker and Microsoft's Cloud Native Application Bundle
  • Red Hat Shares ― Special edition: This year in open source
  • New Contributor Workshop Shanghai

    We recently completed our first New Contributor Summit in China, at the first KubeCon in China. It was very exciting to see all of the Chinese and Asian developers (plus a few folks from around the world) interested in becoming contributors. Over the course of a long day, they learned how, why, and where to contribute to Kubernetes, created a pull requests, attended a panel of current contributors, and got their CLAs signed.

    This was our second New Contributor Workshop (NCW), building on the one created and led by SIG Contributor Experience members in Copenhagen. Because of the audience, it was held in both Chinese and English, taking advantage of the superb simultranslation services the CNCF sponsored. Likewise, the NCW team included both English and Chinese-speaking members of the community: Yang Li, Xiang Peng (Peter) Zhao, Puja Abbassi, Noah Abrahams, Tim Pepper, Zach Corleissen, Sen Lu, and Josh Berkus. In addition to presenting and helping students, the bilingual members of the team translated all of the slides into Chinese. 51 students attended.

  • Minimum viable Kubernetes

    The appeal of Kubernetes is universal. Application development, operations and infrastructure teams recognise diverse reasons for its immediate utility and growing potential — a testament of Kubernetes’ empathetic design. Web apps, galvanised by the 12 factor pattern as well as microservice-structured applications find a native habitat in Kubernetes. Moreover, there is a growing list of analytics and data streaming applications, Function-as-a-Service platforms and deep/machine learning, frameworks that benefit from Kubernetes’ functionality. Add to the mix a deep desire to decouple applications from VMs, increase portability for hybrid cloud operations, and a voracious appetite from the business for continuous innovation. The intrinsic diversity of goals and expectations make the decision for the most appropriate Kubernetes solution challenging. Here, we will explore what constitutes a minimal viable Kubernetes environment from a developer and operations perspective.

Four key Kubernetes growth vectors to watch in the data center

  • Four key Kubernetes growth vectors to watch in the data center

    A little more than four years ago, in June 2014, Google open-sourced Kubernetes, the container orchestration platform based on software that manages the hundreds of thousands of servers that run Google.

    Kubernetes not only beat Apache Mesos and Docker SWARM in the container orchestration race, it has become arguably the hottest technology to emerge since the Linux operating system that commoditized enterprise UNIX operating systems and became the ubiquitous platform for everything from IoT to scale-out cloud computing. It’s no longer if Kubernetes, but how rapidly it will become the dominant way for enterprises to develop and deploy applications.

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