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RISC-V: Western Digital, Freedom and Codasip

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More on Western Digital

  • Western Digital To Open-Source The "SweRV" RISC-V Core In 2019

    More than a year ago Western Digital talked up how they would begin designing RISC-V cores and shipping them in devices and that is indeed panning out. The company has unveiled their new SweRV core and plans to open-source it in 2019.

    At the RISC-V Summit, Western Digital talked about their continued investment into this royalty-free, open-source processor ISA. Their current RISC-V design is dubbed SweRV and is a 32-bit, 2-way super-scalar design that features a 9-stage pipeline core and clocks up to 1.8GHz and manufactured on a 28nm process. Western Digital plans to use SweRV within flash controllers / storage devices and other embedded designs.

The Libre RISC-V Vulkan Accelerator

  • The Libre RISC-V Vulkan Accelerator Will Be Targeting 25 FPS @ 720p, 5~6 GFLOPs

    For those interested in the proposed quad-core RISC-V Libre SoC that is intended to go in-step with the Rust-written Kazan for offering Vulkan support, the initial performance target has now been shared.

    While keeping in mind the Libre RISC-V effort is still very young into its endeavor, the performance target they are hoping for is 1280 x 720 25 fps, 100 Mpixels/sec, 30 Mtriangles/sec, 5-6 GFLOPs, according to their new Libre RISC-V M-Class page. Of course, that's very low by today's standards for GPUs and even for licensable graphics core IP available to embedded/mobile vendors, especially with the Libre RISC-V if everything pans out probably not premiering until 2020 at the earliest. But while the performance may be severely limited compared to what's currently available, their differentiation again is on being a "100% libre" design built atop the royalty-free RISC-V processor ISA.

Microchip

  • Microchip – RISC-V SoC FPGA architecture brings real-time to Linux allowing developers to innovate

    Microchip, via its Microsemi Corporation subsidiary, has extended its Mi-V ecosystem with a new class of SoC FPGAs. The new family joins what is claimed to be the industry’s lowest power mid-range PolarFire FPGA family with a total microprocessor subsystem based on the open, royalty-free RISC-V Instruction Set Architecture.

    The company’s new PolarFire SoC architecture brings real-time deterministic AMP capability to Linux platforms in a multi-core coherent CPU cluster. The SoC architecture, developed in collaboration with SiFive, emphasises a flexible 2MB L2 memory subsystem that can be configured as a cache, scratchpad or direct access memory. This enables designers to implement deterministic real-time embedded applications simultaneously with a rich operating system for a variety of thermal and space-constrained applications in collaborative, networked IoT systems.

    The SoC includes extensive debug capabilities incorporating instruction trace, 50 breakpoints, passive run-time configurable AXI bus monitors and FPGA fabric monitors, in addition to the company’s built-in two-channel logic analyser, SmartDebug.

PCQ Bureau

  • Industry’s first RISC-V SoC FPGA architecture brings real-time to Linux [Ed: PCQ Bureau ‘plagiarises’ a press release, edits it mildly, then pretends it’s a “news” “report” and calls itself a “news” site (filed under “NEWS”)]

    In a new era of computing driven by the convergence of 5G, machine learning and the internet of things (IoT), embedded developers need the richness of Linux-based operating systems. These must meet deterministic system requirements in ever lower power, thermally constrained design environments—all while addressing critical security and reliability requirements.

Western Digital unveils open-source SweRV RISC-V core

  • Western Digital unveils open-source SweRV RISC-V core

    Western Digital has lifted the lid on its first in-house processor, the RISC-V-based SweRV Core, which it is to release under an open source licence.

    That Western Digital has been playing with the open RISC-V instruction set architecture (ISA), using which anyone can produce a processor design without paying a penny in royalties or licensing fees, is no secret: Back in 2017 the company pledged to switch to RISC-V in its storage processing products with a view to shipping a billion cores over the following two years. It's not alone, either: Nvidia has begun transitioning away from proprietary cores to RISC-V to drive input/output in its graphics products, Rambus uses RISC-V in security parts, and it has even found its way into SSD storage controllers.

Western Digital will open source SweRV...

  • Western Digital will open source SweRV RISC-V CPU designs and tools

    On Tuesday, Western Digital, an early adopter and vocal proponent of RISC-V, announced plans to open source their implementation of the RISC-V ISA and associated development resources, providing the ability for the open source community to utilize their implementation of the architecture in their own products as well as iterate on it to meet the needs of their own products.

    SweRV Core EHX1, the first generation of RISC-V processors at Western Digital, is a 32-bit, 2-way superscalar, 9 stage pipeline core capable of clock speeds up to 1.8 GHz, produced on a 28mm CMOS process, at 4.90 CoreMark/MHz, which slightly outperforms ARM Cortex A15 (at 4.72 CoreMark/MHz). For their own products, Western Digital touts it as being fit for "embedded devices supporting data-intensive edge applications, such as storage controllers, industrial IoT, real-time analytics in surveillance systems, and other smart systems." Plans for SweRV Core will be released in Q1 2019.

RISC-V Summit Debuts to Showcase Open Source ISA

  • RISC-V Summit Debuts to Showcase Open Source ISA

    This week there's further proof that RISC-V has arrived. Something over 1,000 professionals, mostly on the hardware side of tech, are attending the first ever RISC-V Summit at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Silicon Valley.

More RISC-V

  • Saving lives with open source, RISC-V and Linux Foundations team up, and more news

    Chip designer ARM pretty much dominates the worlds of embedded systems and the Internet of Things. At least the instruction set architectures (ISA) that underlie those worlds. That could soon change thanks to the RISC-V Foundation teaming up with the Linux Foundation to "to encourage adoption of the open source RISC-V ISA."

    Although the Linux Foundation is better know for its software and IT infrastructure projects, this alliance makes sense according to Rick O’Connor, the RISC-V Foundation's executive director. O'Connor told online publication The Register that the ISA is "where software meets hardware. There's a lot of overlap in our respective ecosystems that will create a fair amount of synergy." The Linux Foundation Jim Zemlin also noted that "RISC-V is a technology that has the potential to greatly advance open hardware architecture."

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