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Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Improved translation po file handling by ditching gettext autotools integration

    The libvirt library has long provided translations of its end user facing strings, which largely means error messages and console output from command line tools / daemons. Since libvirt uses autotools for its build system, it naturally used the standard automake integration provided by gettext for handling .po files. The libvirt.pot file with master strings is exported to Zanata, where the actual translation work is outsourced to the Fedora translation team who support up to ~100 languages. At time of writing libvirt has some level of translation in ~45 languages.

    With use of Zanata, libvirt must periodically create an updated libvirt.pot file and push it to Zanata, and then just before release it must pull the latest translated .po files back into GIT for release.

  • Fedora AMIs for EC2 Instances (A1) Powered by Arm-Based AWS Graviton Processors
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Container Deployment and Security Best Practices John Morello (Twistlock) and Dirk Herrmann (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Twistlock’s John Morello and Red Hat’s Dirk Herrmann gave an in-depth look at the recent NIST Special Publication SP800-190 on Container Security and why it matters if you are deploying containers. They covered best practices for achieving the SP800-190 recommendations on OpenShift.

  • Red Hat achieves AWS Container Competency status
  • Getting started with CI/CD: 6 pitfalls to avoid

    What shapes the long-term success of your CI/CD effort? A faster, more automated pipeline for software development? We recently outlined 4 success factors when getting started with CI/CD – and all led back to culture.

    That’s helpful, but it’s also productive to look at the downsides – not of CI/CD itself, but of common mistakes organizations make, especially when they’re just starting out.

  • IBM's Red Hat Deal Leaves Investors Without A Margin Of Safety
  • Open Outlook: Red Hat on Red Hat

    When I think about the target customer for Red Hat products and services, someone seeking innovative technologies for driving digital transformation at organizational scale, I imagine a customer who looks an awful lot like the IT department at Red Hat. Our challenges mirror those of other IT departments around the world: IT optimization, agile integration, cloud-native application development, automation—these challenges impacting the way IT departments operate today.

    On top of that, Red Hat has grown in the past five years, from roughly 5,700 associates to more than 12,500. Scaling that quickly has been an incredible (and important) stress test for the IT organization. As the needs of our people have changed, the way we assess the IT products we use has also matured.

More in Tux Machines

Variscite unveils two i.MX8 QuadMax modules

Variscite announced Linux-powered “VAR-SOM-MX8” and “SPEAR-MX8” modules with an up to an i.MX8 QuadMax SoC plus up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC. It also previewed a VAR-SOM-6UL COM. At Embedded World next week in Nuremberg, Germany, Variscite will showcase its Linux and Android driven i.MX8-family computer-on-modules, including new VAR-SOM-MX8 and SPEAR-MX8 modules that feature NXP’s highest-end i.MX8 SoC up to a QuadMax model (see farther below). We have already covered most of the other showcased products, including the 14nm fabricated, quad -A53 i.MX8M Mini based DART-MX8M-Mini. When we covered the DART-MX8M-Mini in September, Variscite didn’t have an image or product page, but both are now available here Read more

Android Leftovers

Programming: Developer Happiness, Rblpapi 0.3.8 and Python

  • Developer happiness: What you need to know
    A person needs the right tools for the job. There's nothing as frustrating as getting halfway through a car repair, for instance, only to discover you don't have the specialized tool you need to complete the job. The same concept applies to developers: you need the tools to do what you are best at, without disrupting your workflow with compliance and security needs, so you can produce code faster. Over half—51%, to be specific—of developers spend only one to four hours each day programming, according to ActiveState's recent Developer Survey 2018: Open Source Runtime Pains. In other words, the majority of developers spend less than half of their time coding. According to the survey, 50% of developers say security is one of their biggest concerns, but 67% of developers choose not to add a new language when coding because of the difficulties related to corporate policies.
  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Keeping CRAN happy
    A minimal maintenance release of Rblpapi, now at version 0.3.9, arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the ninth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It accomodates a request by CRAN / R Core to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made (besides updating a now-stale URL at Bloomberg in a few spots and other miniscule maintenance). However, a few other changes have been piling up at the GitHub repo so feel free to try that version too.
  • Episode #200: Escaping Excel Hell with Python and Pandas
  • Testing native ES modules using Mocha and esm.

Games: Steam, Devil Engine, City Game Studio and More