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Necuno Mobile: An open phone with Plasma Mobile

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KDE

With a focus on openness, security and privacy, the Necuno Mobile is built around an ARM® Cortex®-A9 NXP i.MX6 Quad and a Vivante GPU. According to Necuno, none of the closed firmware has access to the memory.

Necuno Solutions is working with open source mobile communities and intends to make their hardware a welcoming platform for Free and open source operating systems in the mobile ecosystem. Plasma Mobile and Necuno Solutions are a perfect match for a community collaboration because of their shared values. The aim is to grow the KDE and Necuno Solutions communities together and attract interested early adopters and developers so that everyone has a chance to join the effort.

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A New Open-Source Linux Phone With KDE Plasma Mobile

  • Necunos Mobile: A New Open-Source Linux Phone With KDE Plasma Mobile

    Most of those wanting an open-source, GNU/Linux-based smartphone have been looking forward to Purism's Librem 5 that will hopefully be shipping in 2019. But now a new option appears to be jumping on the scene: the Necunos Mobile developed by Necuno Solutions in cooperation with the KDE camp.

    Necunos Mobile is a "truly open-source hardware platform" based on an NXP i.MX6 SoC. There will be closed-source firmware involved but it's reported that the firmware blobs will not have access to the main system memory.

First truly open-source smartphone?

  • First truly open-source smartphone? Necuno unveils its KDE on Linux handset

    Almost exactly five years ago, Jolla launched the Jolla Phone. It got a reasonable reception because of the company's story: a group of ex-Nokia engineers who still believed in Nokia's abandoned MeeGo OS and were going to keep it alive with Sailfish OS to give the world a viable open-source alternative to Android.

    Jolla long ago gave up on hardware while Sailfish OS lives on with a small but loyal following. But the OS hasn't come anywhere near to unseating Android's dominance of smartphones.

    Yesterday, Necuno revealed details about the phone that will spearhead its effort to offer an open-source alternative to iOS and Android. Necuno is teaming up with KDE, the maker of the Plasma desktop for Linux and the Plasma Mobile interface.

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