Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Forging an anti-terrorism search tool

Filed under
Misc

Google is the No. 1 free tool to snoop on friends or strangers. But government agencies including the Federal Aviation Administration are investing in a new search engine being developed at the University of Buffalo to do some of their more sensitive detective work.

The technology, released as a prototype in recent weeks, is designed to mine a corpus of documents for associated ideas or connections--connections between two unrelated concepts, for example, that would otherwise go unseen or would take countless hours of investigative work to discover. The project was specifically funded for anti-terrorism efforts and initially was used for searching over data within the 9/11 Commission report and public Web pages related to the suicide bombings carried out by terrorists who hijacked three U.S. commercial planes.

"Say you have the kind of question that connects these two people that we don't know about. You could start reading through all those documents. But our system is designed to look specifically for those evidence trails" that connect those two people, said Rohini Srihari, UB professor of computer science and engineering.

John McCarthy, professor emeritus of computer science at Stanford University, said that linking between concepts is an old idea, but that a new way of doing it could be an important breakthrough. In general, search engines such as Google and Yahoo mine documents for textual clues, or matches to query terms, rather than on the occurrence of ideas. Still, Google is working in the area of searching for concepts.

"The tools that we already have would be more useful if we could search on concepts," McCarthy said.

Srihari and a team in the Center of Excellence in Document Analysis and Recognition in the UB School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have been developing the search engine for the last two years. She said that her team plans to have a deliverable system for the FAA and the intelligence community by the end of the year, but it will not be widely available to the public. The underlying research, co-funded by the National Science Foundation, will also be published.

The technology, called a concept chain graph, uses different mathematical algorithms for finding the best path for connecting two different concepts. It will then list the strongest to weakest links.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

OpenStack's Mission Is Total Victory

Marten Mickos, the incoming head of HP's cloud efforts, sets an audacious goal for the open-source cloud. When the OpenStack Silicon Valley conference schedule was first announced several months ago, Marten Mickos was best known as the CEO of Eucalyptus, which is a rival effort to OpenStack. Mickos' position is now set to change thanks to his company's acquisition by Hewlett-Packard, which was announced Sept. 11. Read more

Why the Convergent Desktop is So Important to Linux

There is one truth that all the Linux faithful hold near and dear to their hearts -- that Linux is a leader when it comes to innovation. No other platform has been able to stake that claim for such a long period of time. Even when a different platform unveils something new, many times that innovation can be traced back to Linux. One such technology is the convergent desktop. The idea behind the convergent desktop is simple -- a seamless transition from mobile to desktop (or laptop). This all started, for better or worse, with Ubuntu Edge. The idea behind Ubuntu Edge was brilliant: A high-end smartphone that, when plugged into a dock, would serve as a traditional desktop. Although the project ultimately failed (due to an inability to raise the $32 million dollars necessary to bring Ubuntu Edge to life), the idea stuck and now every platform is in a race to deliver the convergent desktop. Read more

Things to do after installing Kubuntu

Kubuntu has fully matured and stabilized and comes with the brand new KDE Plasma workspaces and other KDE technologies. Like any other operating system Kubuntu also needs a little bit of work to get it ready for you. There are a few things which are optional and I have added them here based on my own usage, you may not need them. Read more

LaKademy 2014

From August 27th to 30th, 2014, nearly sixteen KDE lovers met in the 2nd LaKademy - The KDE Latin America Summit. The sprint took place in the Free Software Competence Center (CCSL) at University of São Paulo (USP) in southeast Brazil. Read more