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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Red Hat DevSecOps Day in San Diego on November 8
  • The Ripple Effects of IBM's Big Bet on Red Hat
  • Red Hat Aims To Be The Default Choice For Next-Generation IT

    Prior to announcement, I caught up with Red Hat Chief Information Officer Mike Kelly, who offered thoughts on the steps his team had undertaken to continue to improve Red Hat's product (using a Red Hat-on-Red Hat program), to advise technology executives at various stages of leveraging open source technology, and in improving the overall operation. Clearly these are the sorts of improvements that helped make the company attractive to IBM.

  • Planet KDE Categories

    Jings no wonder people find computer programming scary when the most easily accessible lanugage, JavaScript, is also the most messy one.

    Occationally people would mention to me that the categories on Planet KDE didn’t work and eventually I looked into it and it mostly worked but also sometimes maybe it didn’t. Turns out we were checking for no cookies being set and if not we’d set some defaults for the categories. But sometimes the CDN would set a cookie first and ours would not get set at all. This was hard to recreate as it didn’t happen when working locally of course. And then our JavaScript had at least three different ways to run the initial-setup code but there’s no easy way to just read a cookie, madness I tell you. Anyway it should be fixed now and set categories by default but only if it hasn’t set some before so you may still have to manually choose which you read.

  • FAW 2018 Day 3: “Becoming part of Fedora family because of her!”
  • KubeCon and CloudNativeCon

    This December, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, will be present at KubeCon and CloudNativeCon in Seattle.
    The team at Ubuntu will be out in force showcasing their work across Kubernetes and containers and highlighting what makes Ubuntu the platform of choice for developers.

  • Clear Linux Developers Weigh Supporting Snaps

    While Clear Linux augments their package/bundle archive with Flatpak support on the desktop, they are currently deciding whether to also support Snaps that are commonly associated with Ubuntu Linux.

More in Tux Machines

New Raspberry Pi A+ board shrinks RPi 3B+ features to HAT dimensions

A HAT-sized, $25, Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ will soon arrive with the same 1.4GHz quad-A53 SoC, dual-band WiFi, and 40-pin GPIO of the RPi 3B+, but with only 512MB RAM, one USB, and no LAN. As promised, Raspberry Pi Trading has revived its old mini-size, four-year old Raspberry Pi Model A+ SBC with a new Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ model. Measuring the same 65 x 56mm as the earlier $20 RPi A+, the SBC will go on sale in early December for $25. Read more

Android Leftovers

Canonical Extends Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Linux Support to 10 Years

BERLIN — In a keynote at the OpenStack Summit here, Mark Shuttleworth, founder and CEO of Canonical Inc and Ubuntu, detailed the progress made by his Linux distribution in the cloud and announced new extended support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) debuted back on April 26, providing new server and cloud capabilities. An LTS release comes with five year of support, but during his keynote Shuttleworth announced that 18.04 would have support that is available for up to 10 years. "I'm delighted to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for a full 10 years," Shuttleworth said. "In part because of the very long time horizons in some of industries like financial services and telecommunications but also from IOT where manufacturing lines for example are being deployed that will be in production for at least a decade ." Read more

Benchmarking Packet.com's Bare Metal Intel Xeon / AMD EPYC Cloud

With the tests earlier this week of the 16-way AMD EPYC cloud comparison the real standout of those tests across Amazon EC2, Packet, and SkySilk was Packet's bare metal cloud. For just $1.00 USD per hour it's possible to have bare metal access to an AMD EPYC 7401P 24-core / 48-thread server that offers incredible value compared to the other public cloud options for on-demand pricing. That led me to running some more benchmarks of Packet.com's other bare metal cloud options to see how the Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC options compare. Packet's on-demand server options for their "bare metal cloud" offerings range from an Intel Atom C2550 quad-core server with 8GB of RAM at just 7 cents per hour up to a dual Xeon Gold 6120 server with 28 cores at two dollars per hour with 384GB of RAM and 3.2TB of NVMe storage. There are also higher-end instances including NVIDIA GPUs but those are on a dynamic spot pricing basis. Read more