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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • SD Times news digest: Eggplant’s DAI Suite, Scylla Open Source 3.0, and Data Engine by Periscope Data

    ScyllaDB has announced a major release of its database, Scylla Open Source 3.0. The release introduces preview support for concurrent OLTP and OLAP, materialized views, secondary indexes, and Cassandra 3.0 file format compatibility.

  • “Peace Has Broken Out” In Software Development, Heralding Open Source As The Future

    “Peace has broken out” between big technology companies and the free and open source software (FOSS) community, according to a leading FOSS advocate, leading a tech industry representative to say, “this is the future.”

  • Sold out LPC 2018 starts in a week — info for attendees

    In just one week, the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference will begin on November 13 with microconferences, a refereed track, Networking Summit track, Kernel Summit track, BoFs, and more. The conference is completely sold out at this point, sadly we cannot accommodate those on the waiting list. Below is some information for conference attendees.

  • LibreOffice 6.0.7 and 6.1.3 Updated to Integrate a Security Patch with Improved Quality and Stability

    LibreOffice recently released LibreOffice 6.0.7 and LibreOffice 6.1.3 on November 5th 2018. The announcement was made on The Document Foundation blog. According to the blog post, the updates will improve the stability and quality of the previous releases and integrate a security patch.

  • GraphQL Gets Its Own Foundation
  • Radxa Launching the Rock Pi SBC, Mender.io Collaborating with Google Cloud IoT Core, Parasoft's New Initiative to Support Open-Source Projects, New Foundation Formed for GraphQL and Keeper Security Announces BreachWatch Dark Web Monitoring Product

    Parasoft announces a new initiative to support open-source projects and communities. The company plans to offer free access to its tool suite "enabling developers to leverage test automation software, deep code analysis, and security capabilities for their open-source projects". To be eligible, developers must "prove they are an active contributor and vital to an open-source project that is recognized within the global open-source community. The free user licenses will be valid for one year." Send email to opensource@parasoft.com for more information.

    The Linux Foundation is forming a new foundation to support the open-source GraphQL specification. eWeek reports that "the move to create a new vendor-neutral independent foundation under the Linux Foundation will help further advance the development of GraphQL". The GraphQL started out as an internal project at Facebook for its newsfeed API and was open-sourced in 2015. Currently, the specification is used "beyond Facebook by web properties including GitHub, Shopify, Twitter and Airbnb, among others".

  • OpenSMTPD released and upcoming filters preview

    Filters have been a (the most ?) long awaited feature in OpenSMTPD.
    I finally committed most of the filters code to OpenBSD.
    There is still a bit of work required but the trickiest parts are done.
    This article describes how filters are implemented and what to expect.

  • Linux Fu: Pimp Your Pipes [Ed: That’s GNU. Not Linux.]

    One of the best things about working at the Linux (or similar OS) command line is the use of pipes. In simple terms, a pipe takes the output of one command and sends it to the input of another command. You can do a lot with a pipe, but sometimes it is hard to work out the right order for a set of pipes. A common trick is to attack it incrementally. That is, do one command and get it working with the right options and inputs. Then add another command until that works. Keep adding commands and tweaking until you get the final results.

  • Rcpp 1.0.0: The Tenth Birthday Release

    As mentioned here two days ago, the Rcpp package turned ten on Monday—and we used to opportunity to mark the current version as 1.0.0! Thanks to everybody who liked and retweeted our tweet about this. And of course, once more a really big Thank You! to everybody who helped along this journey: Rcpp Core team, contributors, bug reporters, workshop and tutorial attendees and last but not least all those users – we did well. So let’s enjoy and celebrate this moment.

    As indicated in Monday’s blog post, we had also planned to upload this version to CRAN, and this 1.0.0 release arrived on CRAN after the customary inspection and is now available. I will build the Debian package in a moment, it will find its way to Ubuntu and of the CRAN-mirrored backport that Michael looks after so well.

    While this release is of course marked as 1.0.0 signifying the feature and release stability we have had for some time, it also marks another regular release at the now-common bi-monthly schedule following nineteen releases since July 2016 in the 0.12.* series as well as another five in the preceding 0.11.* series.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE: YaST Development Sprint 84 and SUSE 'in Space'

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 84

    The YaST Team finished yet another development sprint last week and we want to take the opportunity to let you all glance over the engine room to see what’s going on. Today we will confess an uncomfortable truth about how we manage the Qt user interface, will show you how we organize our work (or at least, how we try to keep the administrative part of that under control) and will give you a sneak peak on some upcoming YaST features and improvements. Let’s go for it!

  • Lunar Vacation Planning

    HPE, one of SUSE’s most important partners in High-Performance Computing and the advancement of science and technology, is now building NASA’s new supercomputer named “Aitken” to support Artemis and future human missions to the moon. HPE’s “Aitken” supercomputer will be built at NASA’s Ames Research Center and will run SUSE Linux Enterprise HPC (co-located where the Pleiades supercomputer – also SUSE-based – has been advancing research for several years). Aitken will run extremely complex simulations for entry, descent and landing on the moon as part of the Artemis program. The missions include landing the next humans on the lunar south polar region by 2024 (on the rim of the Shackleton crater, which experiences constant indirect sunlight for a toasty -300 degrees Fahrenheit).

today's howtos

Flathub vs. Snap Store: Which App Store Should You Use?

Linux package management has come a long way from the nightmare it used to be. Still, the package managers provided by distributions aren’t always perfect. The Snap and Flatpak formats have made it much easier to install software no matter what distro you’re running. Both Snap and Flatpak files are often available on a given app’s website, but both of these formats have their own centralized marketplaces. Which one is right for you? It’s not an easy question to answer. Read more

GhostBSD 19.09 Now Available

GhostBSD 19.09 has some considerable changes happened, like moving the system to STABLE instead of CURRENT for ABI stability with the integration of the latest system update developed by TrueOS. This also means that current users will need to reinstall GhostBSD unless they were running on the development version of GhostBSD 19.09. GhostBSD 19.09 marks the last major changes the breaks updates for software and system upgrade. Read more