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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • SD Times news digest: Eggplant’s DAI Suite, Scylla Open Source 3.0, and Data Engine by Periscope Data

    ScyllaDB has announced a major release of its database, Scylla Open Source 3.0. The release introduces preview support for concurrent OLTP and OLAP, materialized views, secondary indexes, and Cassandra 3.0 file format compatibility.

  • “Peace Has Broken Out” In Software Development, Heralding Open Source As The Future

    “Peace has broken out” between big technology companies and the free and open source software (FOSS) community, according to a leading FOSS advocate, leading a tech industry representative to say, “this is the future.”

  • Sold out LPC 2018 starts in a week — info for attendees

    In just one week, the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference will begin on November 13 with microconferences, a refereed track, Networking Summit track, Kernel Summit track, BoFs, and more. The conference is completely sold out at this point, sadly we cannot accommodate those on the waiting list. Below is some information for conference attendees.

  • LibreOffice 6.0.7 and 6.1.3 Updated to Integrate a Security Patch with Improved Quality and Stability

    LibreOffice recently released LibreOffice 6.0.7 and LibreOffice 6.1.3 on November 5th 2018. The announcement was made on The Document Foundation blog. According to the blog post, the updates will improve the stability and quality of the previous releases and integrate a security patch.

  • GraphQL Gets Its Own Foundation
  • Radxa Launching the Rock Pi SBC, Mender.io Collaborating with Google Cloud IoT Core, Parasoft's New Initiative to Support Open-Source Projects, New Foundation Formed for GraphQL and Keeper Security Announces BreachWatch Dark Web Monitoring Product

    Parasoft announces a new initiative to support open-source projects and communities. The company plans to offer free access to its tool suite "enabling developers to leverage test automation software, deep code analysis, and security capabilities for their open-source projects". To be eligible, developers must "prove they are an active contributor and vital to an open-source project that is recognized within the global open-source community. The free user licenses will be valid for one year." Send email to opensource@parasoft.com for more information.

    The Linux Foundation is forming a new foundation to support the open-source GraphQL specification. eWeek reports that "the move to create a new vendor-neutral independent foundation under the Linux Foundation will help further advance the development of GraphQL". The GraphQL started out as an internal project at Facebook for its newsfeed API and was open-sourced in 2015. Currently, the specification is used "beyond Facebook by web properties including GitHub, Shopify, Twitter and Airbnb, among others".

  • OpenSMTPD released and upcoming filters preview

    Filters have been a (the most ?) long awaited feature in OpenSMTPD.
    I finally committed most of the filters code to OpenBSD.
    There is still a bit of work required but the trickiest parts are done.
    This article describes how filters are implemented and what to expect.

  • Linux Fu: Pimp Your Pipes [Ed: That’s GNU. Not Linux.]

    One of the best things about working at the Linux (or similar OS) command line is the use of pipes. In simple terms, a pipe takes the output of one command and sends it to the input of another command. You can do a lot with a pipe, but sometimes it is hard to work out the right order for a set of pipes. A common trick is to attack it incrementally. That is, do one command and get it working with the right options and inputs. Then add another command until that works. Keep adding commands and tweaking until you get the final results.

  • Rcpp 1.0.0: The Tenth Birthday Release

    As mentioned here two days ago, the Rcpp package turned ten on Monday—and we used to opportunity to mark the current version as 1.0.0! Thanks to everybody who liked and retweeted our tweet about this. And of course, once more a really big Thank You! to everybody who helped along this journey: Rcpp Core team, contributors, bug reporters, workshop and tutorial attendees and last but not least all those users – we did well. So let’s enjoy and celebrate this moment.

    As indicated in Monday’s blog post, we had also planned to upload this version to CRAN, and this 1.0.0 release arrived on CRAN after the customary inspection and is now available. I will build the Debian package in a moment, it will find its way to Ubuntu and of the CRAN-mirrored backport that Michael looks after so well.

    While this release is of course marked as 1.0.0 signifying the feature and release stability we have had for some time, it also marks another regular release at the now-common bi-monthly schedule following nineteen releases since July 2016 in the 0.12.* series as well as another five in the preceding 0.11.* series.

More in Tux Machines

New Raspberry Pi A+ board shrinks RPi 3B+ features to HAT dimensions

A HAT-sized, $25, Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ will soon arrive with the same 1.4GHz quad-A53 SoC, dual-band WiFi, and 40-pin GPIO of the RPi 3B+, but with only 512MB RAM, one USB, and no LAN. As promised, Raspberry Pi Trading has revived its old mini-size, four-year old Raspberry Pi Model A+ SBC with a new Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ model. Measuring the same 65 x 56mm as the earlier $20 RPi A+, the SBC will go on sale in early December for $25. Read more

Android Leftovers

Canonical Extends Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Linux Support to 10 Years

BERLIN — In a keynote at the OpenStack Summit here, Mark Shuttleworth, founder and CEO of Canonical Inc and Ubuntu, detailed the progress made by his Linux distribution in the cloud and announced new extended support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) debuted back on April 26, providing new server and cloud capabilities. An LTS release comes with five year of support, but during his keynote Shuttleworth announced that 18.04 would have support that is available for up to 10 years. "I'm delighted to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for a full 10 years," Shuttleworth said. "In part because of the very long time horizons in some of industries like financial services and telecommunications but also from IOT where manufacturing lines for example are being deployed that will be in production for at least a decade ." Read more

Benchmarking Packet.com's Bare Metal Intel Xeon / AMD EPYC Cloud

With the tests earlier this week of the 16-way AMD EPYC cloud comparison the real standout of those tests across Amazon EC2, Packet, and SkySilk was Packet's bare metal cloud. For just $1.00 USD per hour it's possible to have bare metal access to an AMD EPYC 7401P 24-core / 48-thread server that offers incredible value compared to the other public cloud options for on-demand pricing. That led me to running some more benchmarks of Packet.com's other bare metal cloud options to see how the Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC options compare. Packet's on-demand server options for their "bare metal cloud" offerings range from an Intel Atom C2550 quad-core server with 8GB of RAM at just 7 cents per hour up to a dual Xeon Gold 6120 server with 28 cores at two dollars per hour with 384GB of RAM and 3.2TB of NVMe storage. There are also higher-end instances including NVIDIA GPUs but those are on a dynamic spot pricing basis. Read more