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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • SD Times news digest: Eggplant’s DAI Suite, Scylla Open Source 3.0, and Data Engine by Periscope Data

    ScyllaDB has announced a major release of its database, Scylla Open Source 3.0. The release introduces preview support for concurrent OLTP and OLAP, materialized views, secondary indexes, and Cassandra 3.0 file format compatibility.

  • “Peace Has Broken Out” In Software Development, Heralding Open Source As The Future

    “Peace has broken out” between big technology companies and the free and open source software (FOSS) community, according to a leading FOSS advocate, leading a tech industry representative to say, “this is the future.”

  • Sold out LPC 2018 starts in a week — info for attendees

    In just one week, the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference will begin on November 13 with microconferences, a refereed track, Networking Summit track, Kernel Summit track, BoFs, and more. The conference is completely sold out at this point, sadly we cannot accommodate those on the waiting list. Below is some information for conference attendees.

  • LibreOffice 6.0.7 and 6.1.3 Updated to Integrate a Security Patch with Improved Quality and Stability

    LibreOffice recently released LibreOffice 6.0.7 and LibreOffice 6.1.3 on November 5th 2018. The announcement was made on The Document Foundation blog. According to the blog post, the updates will improve the stability and quality of the previous releases and integrate a security patch.

  • GraphQL Gets Its Own Foundation
  • Radxa Launching the Rock Pi SBC, Mender.io Collaborating with Google Cloud IoT Core, Parasoft's New Initiative to Support Open-Source Projects, New Foundation Formed for GraphQL and Keeper Security Announces BreachWatch Dark Web Monitoring Product

    Parasoft announces a new initiative to support open-source projects and communities. The company plans to offer free access to its tool suite "enabling developers to leverage test automation software, deep code analysis, and security capabilities for their open-source projects". To be eligible, developers must "prove they are an active contributor and vital to an open-source project that is recognized within the global open-source community. The free user licenses will be valid for one year." Send email to opensource@parasoft.com for more information.

    The Linux Foundation is forming a new foundation to support the open-source GraphQL specification. eWeek reports that "the move to create a new vendor-neutral independent foundation under the Linux Foundation will help further advance the development of GraphQL". The GraphQL started out as an internal project at Facebook for its newsfeed API and was open-sourced in 2015. Currently, the specification is used "beyond Facebook by web properties including GitHub, Shopify, Twitter and Airbnb, among others".

  • OpenSMTPD released and upcoming filters preview

    Filters have been a (the most ?) long awaited feature in OpenSMTPD.
    I finally committed most of the filters code to OpenBSD.
    There is still a bit of work required but the trickiest parts are done.
    This article describes how filters are implemented and what to expect.

  • Linux Fu: Pimp Your Pipes [Ed: That’s GNU. Not Linux.]

    One of the best things about working at the Linux (or similar OS) command line is the use of pipes. In simple terms, a pipe takes the output of one command and sends it to the input of another command. You can do a lot with a pipe, but sometimes it is hard to work out the right order for a set of pipes. A common trick is to attack it incrementally. That is, do one command and get it working with the right options and inputs. Then add another command until that works. Keep adding commands and tweaking until you get the final results.

  • Rcpp 1.0.0: The Tenth Birthday Release

    As mentioned here two days ago, the Rcpp package turned ten on Monday—and we used to opportunity to mark the current version as 1.0.0! Thanks to everybody who liked and retweeted our tweet about this. And of course, once more a really big Thank You! to everybody who helped along this journey: Rcpp Core team, contributors, bug reporters, workshop and tutorial attendees and last but not least all those users – we did well. So let’s enjoy and celebrate this moment.

    As indicated in Monday’s blog post, we had also planned to upload this version to CRAN, and this 1.0.0 release arrived on CRAN after the customary inspection and is now available. I will build the Debian package in a moment, it will find its way to Ubuntu and of the CRAN-mirrored backport that Michael looks after so well.

    While this release is of course marked as 1.0.0 signifying the feature and release stability we have had for some time, it also marks another regular release at the now-common bi-monthly schedule following nineteen releases since July 2016 in the 0.12.* series as well as another five in the preceding 0.11.* series.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Django, PHP, Polonius and More

  • Django 2.2 alpha 1 released
    Django 2.2 alpha 1 is now available. It represents the first stage in the 2.2 release cycle and is an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 2.2. Django 2.2 has a salmagundi of new features which you can read about in the in-development 2.2 release notes.
  • Eliminating PHP polyfills
    The Symfony project has recently created a set of pure-PHP polyfills for both PHP extensions and newer language features. It allows developers to add requirements upon those functions or language additions without increasing the system requirements upon end users. For the most part, I think this is a good thing, and valuable to have. We've done similar things inside MediaWiki as well for CDB support, Memcached, and internationalization, just to name a few. But the downside is that on platforms where it is possible to install the missing PHP extensions or upgrade PHP itself, we're shipping empty code. MediaWiki requires both the ctypes and mbstring PHP extensions, and our servers have those, so there's no use in deploying polyfills for those, because they'll never be used. In September, Reedy and I replaced the polyfills with "unpolyfills" that simply provide the correct package, so the polyfill is skipped by composer. That removed about 3,700 lines of code from what we're committing, reviewing, and deploying - a big win.
  • Polonius and region errors
    Now that NLL has been shipped, I’ve been doing some work revisiting the Polonius project. Polonius is the project that implements the “alias-based formulation” described in my older blogpost. Polonius has come a long way since that post; it’s now quite fast and also experimentally integrated into rustc, where it passes the full test suite.
  • Serious Python released!
    Well, Serious Python is the the new name of The Hacker's Guide to Python — the first book I published. Serious Python is the 4th update of that book — but with a brand a new name and a new editor!

today's howtos

Ditching Out-of-Date Documentation Infrastructure

Long ago, the Linux kernel started using 00-Index files to list the contents of each documentation directory. This was intended to explain what each of those files documented. Henrik Austad recently pointed out that those files have been out of date for a very long time and were probably not used by anyone anymore. This is nothing new. Henrik said in his post that this had been discussed already for years, "and they have since then grown further out of date, so perhaps it is time to just throw them out." He counted hundreds of instances where the 00-index file was out of date or not present when it should have been. He posted a patch to rip them all unceremoniously out of the kernel. Joe Perches was very pleased with this. He pointed out that .rst files (the kernel's native documentation format) had largely taken over the original purpose of those 00-index files. He said the oo-index files were even misleading by now. Read more

Mozilla: Rust 1.32.0, Privacy, UX and Firefox Nightly

  • Announcing Rust 1.32.0
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.32.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.
  • Rust 1.32 Released With New Debugger Macro, Jemalloc Disabled By Default
    For fans of Rustlang, it's time to fire up rustup: Rust 1.32 is out today as the latest feature update for this increasingly popular programming language. The Rust 1.32 release brings dbg!() as a new debug macro to print the value of a variable as well as its file/line-number and it works with more than just variables but also commands.
  • Julien Vehent: Maybe don't throw away your VPN just yet...
    At Mozilla, we've long adopted single sign on, first using SAML, nowadays using OpenID Connect (OIDC). Most of our applications, both public facing and internal, require SSO to protect access to privileged resources. We never trust the network and always require strong authentication. And yet, we continue to maintain VPNs to protect our most sensitive admin panels. "How uncool", I hear you object, "and here we thought you were all about DevOps and shit". And you would be correct, but I'm also pragmatic, and I can't count the number of times we've had authentication bugs that let our red team or security auditors bypass authentication. The truth is, even highly experienced programmers and operators make mistakes and will let a bug disable or fail to protect part of that one super sensitive page you never want to leave open to the internet. And I never blame them because SSO/OAuth/OIDC are massively complex protocols that require huge libraries that fail in weird and unexpected ways. I've never reached the point where I fully trust our SSO, because we find one of those auth bypass every other month. Here's the catch: they never lead to major security incidents because we put all our admin panels behind a good old VPN.
  • Reflections on a co-design workshop
    Co-design workshops help designers learn first-hand the language of the people who use their products, in addition to their pain points, workflows, and motivations. With co-design methods [1] participants are no longer passive recipients of products. Rather, they are involved in the envisioning and re-imagination of them. Participants show us what they need and want through sketching and design exercises. The purpose of a co-design workshop is not to have a pixel-perfect design to implement, rather it’s to learn more about the people who use or will use the product, and to involve them in generating ideas about what to design. We ran a co-design workshop at Mozilla to inform our product design, and we’d like to share our experience with you. [...] Our UX team was tasked with improving the Firefox browser extension experience. When people create browser extensions, they use a form to submit their creations. They submit their code and all the metadata about the extension (name, description, icon, etc.). The metadata provided in the submission form is used to populate the extension’s product page on addons.mozilla.org.
  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 51