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RK3399 based Raspberry Pi clone will launch at $49 — or even lower

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Linux

Radxa has posted specs for a $49 and up, community backed “Rock Pi” Raspberry Pi lookalike with a Rockchip RK3399, USB 3.0, M.2, HDMI 2.0, and native GbE, plus optional WiFi, BT, and PoE.

Radxa is prepping a Rockchip RK3399-based Raspberry Pi pseudo clone called the Rock Pi. It joins the RK3399-based NanoPi M4 in closely matching the RPi 3 layout, and it appears it may be the most affordable RK3399 based SBC yet, starting at $49 with 2GB RAM, and possibly lower for the unpriced 1GB model.

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Raspberry Pi clone Rock Pi 4 starts at just $39

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