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Linux Mint 19.1 Will Feature a ‘Modern’ Desktop Layout

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

We’re expecting the release of Linux Mint 19.1 to arrive just before the Christmas holidays and, like your nearest and dearest, it’ll be bringing a few surprises with it.

The Linux 19.1 release will include the Cinnamon 4.0 desktop environment by default and this, Mint’s devs say, will “look more modern” than it does not.

How? By using a new panel layout.

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Linux Mint 19.1 'Tessa' coming this Christmas

  • Linux Mint 19.1 'Tessa' coming this Christmas

    December is coming, which means one of my favorite holidays, Christmas, is fairly imminent. While I enjoy spending time with family to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, I’d be lying if I said I don’t like getting presents. Heck, I really enjoy giving gifts too.

    Not all Christmas gifts need to be physical -- sometimes a Linux distribution can be equally rewarding! Case in point, today, we learn Linux Mint 19.1 -- which is named "Tessa" -- will be released around Christmastime. In addition, the Mint developers have launched an official Patreon account as a new way to get funding from users. More importantly, there are some significant upcoming improvements to the Cinnamon desktop environment.

Linux Mint 19.1 has been slated for Christmas release

  • Linux Mint 19.1 has been slated for Christmas release

    Clement Lefebvre, has announced that the upcoming Linux Mint 19.1 ‘Tessa’ will be available in time for Christmas this year. In the past, the project has had trouble releasing all of its variants at the same time, however, Clem confirmed that the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions will all be released at the same time. Additionally, upgrade paths will be opened on the same day without the usual delay.

Linux Mint 19.1 Lands This Christmas with Cinnamon 4.0

  • Linux Mint 19.1 Lands This Christmas with Cinnamon 4.0, Mainline Kernels Support

    Clement Lefebvre published his monthly newsletter to let us know what new features and improvements are being worked on for the next release of the Linux Mint operating system.

    Announced last month as the first update to the Linux Mint 19 series, Linux Mint 19.1 is dubbed "Tessa" and it will bring all the goodies from the Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (Bionic Beaver) release on top of the a brand-new Cinnamon 4.0 desktop environment that's yet to see the light of day.

    The Cinnamon 4.0 desktop environment in Linux Mint 19.1 looks to shape up as a modern desktop interface thanks to a new panel layout with a larger and darker design. But the good old Cinnamon won't go away, as the developers promise it will be one click away if you don't like the new look.

Now in Forbes; Xubuntu Development Update

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Programming Leftovers

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  • Bootstrappable builds

    The idea of Reproducible Builds—being able to recreate bit-for-bit identical binaries using the same source code—has gained momentum over the last few years. Reproducible builds provide some safeguards against bad actors in the software supply chain. But building software depends on the tools used to construct the binary, including compilers and build-automation tools, many of which depend on pre-existing binaries. Minimizing the reliance on opaque binaries for building our software ecosystem is the goal of the Bootstrappable Builds project. For example, GCC is written in C and C++, which means that it requires compilers for those two languages in order to be built from source. In practice, that generally means a distribution would use its existing binary executables of those tools to build a new GCC version, which would then be released to users. One of the concerns with that approach is described in Unix inventor Ken Thompson's Turing Award lecture "Reflections on Trusting Trust" [PDF]. In a nutshell, Thompson said that trusting the output of a binary compiler is an act of faith that someone has not tampered with the creation of that binary—even if the source code is available. The Bootstrappable Builds project was started as an offshoot of the Reproducible Builds project during the latter's 2016 summit in Berlin. A bootstrappable build takes the idea of reproducibility one step further, in some sense. The build of a target binary can be reproduced alongside the build of the tools required to do so. It is, conceptually, almost like building a house from a large collection of atoms of different elements.

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    Integers are not enough, and floats are flawed? Decimals to the rescue! A short guide of what’s important when working with decimals in Elixir. This post is about the Decimal 2.0 module from decimal Hex package. As with every module in Elixir, running h Module and Module.module_info in IEx is a good place to start.

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    You are given a number $N. Write a script to figure out if the given number is Palindrome. Print 1 if true otherwise 0.

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  • The terminal, the console and the shell - what are they?

    The other day, as I was going through some of my old notes, I stumbled upon something I had written about the console, the terminal and the shell on Unix-like operating systems. I have decided to rewrite these notes in order to share them here on my website. So without further ado we will now stroll down memory lane and take a quick look at the origins of the Unix terminal and shell. And I will also give my advice to new users on Linux or BSD regarding the choice of terminal emulator and shell.

Raspberry Pi: EasyOS, YARH.IO, Proprietary Blobs and Inkplate

     
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  • Stripped-down Raspberry Pi 3B+ SBC powers YARH.IO Micro 2 DIY handheld PC

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Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

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Carbon Player – desktop media player

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