Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ZenWalk 4.0: Great Taste, Less Volkerding

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I do not like Slackware. Let me get that out right now. This should be obvious to anyone who's read my rants or had the misfortune to mistake my Slackware 11 rant for a real review and decided to subsequently question my IQ and parentage on the comments section of OSNews. Zenwalk is a derivative of Slackware, so it's starting out the game with two strikes against it. However it has been several versions since I last looked at this distro (2.4). Let's see if it can make up for its parent.

Install:

The installer is your basic ncurses text-based affair, essentially the same as the default Slackware installer. The main difference is you don't seem to be able to choose what gets installed. As soon as I was done partitioning the installer sped off on its merry way.

The opening splash was quite pleasant. I was then greeted by an ncurses setup screen that configured my soundcard and set up a regular user for me. This is a definite improvement from Slackware.

Full Story.

This idiot again?

There's no question in my mind about what his IQ is...
__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

Zenwalk - yes, but don't ask for information

I liked Zenwalk and its rendering of Xfce but discovered too late that its claim to have Kde was a falsehood. It only had part of Kde and the bits I wanted were the missing bits.

I've made valiant efforts since the release of version 4.0 to find out what Kde packages are available now but the developers seem determined to hide any information.

It's another one of those distros that expects to convince you with glitz and glimmer instead of facts. Not for me.

For seekers only

RE: Zenwalk - yes, but don't ask for information

Don't be fscking stupid.

KDE and GNOME and EXTRA and SERVERS can be found in the online repositories: e.g. http://download.zenwalk.org/i486/current/

"extra" are extra apps
"g" is GNOME
"kde" is KDE
"s" is LAMP+Samba+Webmin

Just fscking ask! http://support.zenwalk.org/

Zenwalk's evolution

"Béranger" wrote:
Just fscking ask! http://support.zenwalk.org/

I did ask, Einstein. The children were too excited about having a new version to play with. http://download.zenwalk.org/ was not accessible to my browser at the time of the release and for some weeks later.

When I tried Zenwalk, KDE definitely did NOT include kdeutils and at least part of kdepim and there was no intention to add the missing packages.

Maybe one day Zenwalk and its developers will mature. Not its users, obviously. They make even Ubuntu users look like adults.

----
I try to take one day at a time -- but sometimes several days attack me at once - Ashleigh Brilliant

Please take the time to test

Hi,

Some precisions :

You wrote : "I do not like Slackware"
-> It's not fair for Pat. Anyway Slackware is not chocolate, it's a GNU operating system, so taste is irrelevant.

You wrote : "The installer is your basic ncurses text-based affair,"
-> Just like the Ubuntu one ! Zenwalk is not a live CD Smile

You wrote : "I logged in as root, deleted my user and recreated it with useradd."
-> you simply created an account without setting the expiration date. By default it's set to 1 day. You should take the time to read all install dialogs : there's a "Never" button if you don't want an expiration date. Userconfig is superior than useradd. useradd is a prehistoric tool that shouldn't be used by users. Plus : userconfig will setup the desktop environment, theme, wallpaper, menu layout, ...... not useradd

You wrote : "The window manager is XFce, with an added program that actually gives you a real desktop with icons."
-> Wrong, Current XFCE has desktop icons handling by default. It's just that most distribution provide outdated versions of XFCE. Nothing was added concerning desktop management, XFCE does it by its own.

You wrote : "kernel headers weren't installed by default"
-> Wrong, kernel headers are installed by default in Zenwalk. What you are talking about is not headers, it's the whole kernel source code which is available as an addon package. To install it just do "netpkg kernelsource", wait 3 minutes, then play Smile

You wrote : "Despite no 3D acceleration"
-> Wrong, of course, Zenwalk is probably the best GNU Linux system for gamers, more than 60 games packages are available from tuxgames.net : the gaming site of Zencommunity. 3D accell availability depends on proprietary code for some cards, it depends.

Please take the time to test before writing a review.

Chucky Wink

re: time to test

I hope you realize that I was just linking to some other guy's review. Your comments might be served better at his site.

Although I admit, I'd had my mixed results with different versions of Zenwalk in the past myself.

Thanks.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re : re: time to test

Of course I know that you would write with a lot more care Smile

Don't worry, it's just that the author's blog doesn't have any "comment" feature, or I didn't manage to find it...

Cheers

Chucky-chuck

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

US Military To Launch Open Source Academy

Open source software, which has become increasingly common throughout the US military from unmanned drones to desktops, has now been enlisted as a career option for military personnel. In September, Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy, marking the first time such a training program has been hosted on a military base. Read more

Video: TedX talk - Richard Stallman

Well, vp9/opus in a webm container have been supported by both Firefox and Google Chrome for several releases now... so enjoy it in your web browser. Read more

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20. Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection! A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website. The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package. Read more