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Gaming PCs Surpass New Consoles

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Hardware
Reviews

Featuring water-cooled microprocessors, beefy graphics cards and gigabytes of memory, current high-end gaming PCs are light years ahead of the latest consoles from Microsoft Corp., Nintendo Co. or Sony Corp. However, they come at a hefty price, however.

Together, two new systems I tested cost nearly $16,000 - as much as a new Honda Civic. But a new car can't run video games, and that's where the Mach V from boutique computer maker Falcon Northwest ($9,621.83 as tested, including a 30-inch display, wireless mouse and keyboard) and Alienware's Area-51 7500 ($5,419) excel. These two screamers are among the fastest, most capable machines money can buy for all your video gaming needs.

So what exactly do you get for that much cash?

Full Story.

Review: Nintendo Wii videogames console

It's midnight and all over the country videogames fans are freezing their butts off while they wait in line to get their mitts on Nintendo's newest - or maybe not, if they haven't pre-ordered. Yes, the Wii goes on sale today, though Reg Hardware has been lucky enough to have enjoyed the company of Zelda and co. in its warm, dry office for a few days now. And boy have we worked up a sweat...

The Wii has to be the first games console to get you up off your rump and onto your feet. Wii Sports, the game that comes bundled with the hardware, will have you swinging your arms around, punching your fists and, if you're not careful, bumping into the furniture and falling over fellow players.

First, the hardware. The Wii is surprisingly compact, though that's as much because it runs off a separate power block - and a large one, too - as the simplicity of the internals. It's about the size of a large hardback novel. All the pre-release publicity pics sent out by Nintendo showed the Wii in its stand, which has the console thrusting up at an angle, but you can sit the machine less prominently on its base, NES-fashion, or on its side.

Full Story.
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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

What a worthless, blatant advertisement...

The reviewer obviously knows little to nothing about computer hardware, nor about current-generation gaming consoles.

The fact is, with Sony submitting their patches for the kernel, using Linux you can do a whole heck of a lot more with your PS3 than play games. It also happens to be upgradeable (the hard drive, anyway), which directly contradicts one of his arguments.

Admittedly, the processor in the Wii only runs at about 730 MHz... but as anybody who's run Slackware on a 650 MHz Thunderbird can tell you, faster ain't always better.

The fact is, performance in hardware is not limited to the number of cycles per second your processor runs. It's based on a number of factors, and you can't objectively compare a PS3 and a gaming PC without a lot of complicated testing.

What really amused me about this article, is that the reviewer seemed to think that costing more meant you were getting more. For $600, I can pick up a PS3 that I can immediately turn into a fantastic desktop computer. Add in a $250 HD-TV, a $100 laser mouse, and an ergonomic keyboard for about $50, and I've got a great setup for $1000... and I still have $8000 left over for an Xbox 360, a Nintendo Wii, a new processor for my laptop, a 2GB stick of memory for said laptop, new tires for my truck... and then, I can buy the parts, and build a clone of one of these things myself.

Sorry, Falcon Northwest. I'll keep my money.
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Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

I agree completely...

"What a worthless, blatant advertisement..."

You said it. Sounds like he was paid by the companies.

"On the flip side, these are computers that can be used to surf the Internet, edit videos, download music and process words in addition to games. Try that with your Wii."

Comparing a $9000 PC to a $250. No need to think about it... that makes perfect sense.

re: worthless

well, dang, I feel bad about linking to it now. Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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